NDSR Applications Open, Projects Announced!

The Library of Congress, Office of Strategic Initiatives and the Institute of Museum and Library Services are pleased to announce the official open call for applications for the 2015 National Digital Stewardship Residency, to be held in the Washington, DC area.  The application period is from December 17, 2014 through January 30, 2015. To apply, go to the official USAJobs page link.

Looking down Pennsylvania Avenue.  Photo by Susan Manus

Looking down Pennsylvania Avenue. Photo by Susan Manus

To qualify, applicants must have a master’s degree or higher, graduating between spring 2013 and spring 2015, with a strong interest in digital stewardship. Currently enrolled doctoral students are also encouraged to apply. Application requirements include a detailed resume and cover letter, undergraduate and graduate transcripts, two letters of recommendation and a creative video that defines an applicant’s interest in the program.  (Visit the NDSR application webpage for more application information.)

For the 2015-16 class, five residents will be chosen for a 12-month residency at a prominent institution in the Washington, D.C. area.  The residency will begin in June, 2015, with an intensive week-long digital stewardship workshop at the Library of Congress. Thereafter, each resident will move to their designated host institution to work on a significant digital stewardship project. These projects will allow them to acquire hands-on knowledge and skills involving the collection, selection, management, long-term preservation and accessibility of digital assets.

We are also pleased to announce the five institutions, along with their projects, that have been chosen as residency hosts for this class of the NDSR. Listed below are the hosts and projects, chosen after a very competitive round of applications:

  • District of Columbia Public Library: Personal Digital Preservation Access and Education through the Public Library.
  • Government Publishing Office: Preparation for Audit and Certification of GPO’s FDsys as a Trustworthy Digital Repository.
  • American Institute of Architects: Building Curation into Records Creation: Developing a Digital Repository Program at the American Institute of Architects.
  • U.S. Senate, Historical Office: Improving Digital Stewardship in the U.S. Senate.
  • National Library of Medicine: NLM-Developed Software as Cultural Heritage.

The inaugural class of the NDSR was also held in Washington, DC in 2013-14. Host institutions for that class included the Association of Research Libraries, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library, Folger Shakespeare Library, Library of Congress, University of Maryland, National Library of Medicine, National Security Archive, Public Broadcasting Service, Smithsonian Institution Archives and the World Bank.

George Coulbourne, Supervisory Program Specialist at the Library of Congress, explains the benefits of the program: “We are excited to be collaborating with such dynamic host institutions for the second NDSR residency class in Washington, DC. In collaboration with the hosts, we look forward to developing the most engaging experience possible for our residents.  Last year’s residents all found employment in fields related to digital stewardship or went on to pursue higher degrees.  We hope to replicate that outcome with this class of residents as well as build bridges between the host institutions and the Library of Congress to advance digital stewardship.”

The residents chosen for NDSR 2015 will be announced by early April 2015. Keep an eye on The Signal for that announcement. For additional information and updates regarding the National Digital Stewardship Residency, please see our website.

See the Library’s official press release here.

“Elementary!” A Sleuth Activity for Personal Digital Archiving

As large institutions and organizations continue to implement preservation processes for their digital collections, a smattering of self-motivated information professionals are trying to reach out to the rest of the world’s digital preservation stakeholders —  individuals and small organizations — to help them manage their digital collections. Part of that challenge is just making people aware that: […]

NDSA New England Regional Meeting Recap

The following is a guest post by Meghan Banach Bergin, Bibliographic Access and Metadata Coordinator, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries. On October 30th, the second New England Regional National Digital Stewardship Alliance (NE NDSA) meeting was held at the University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries.  The meeting was generously sponsored by the Five Colleges Digital Preservation […]

Preserving Carnegie Hall’s Born-Digital Assets: An NDSR Project Update

The following is a guest post by Shira Peltzman, National Digital Stewardship Resident at Carnegie Hall in New York City. As the National Digital Stewardship Resident placed at Carnegie Hall, I have been tasked with creating and implementing policies, procedures and best practices for the preservation of our born-digital assets. Carnegie Hall produces a staggering […]

Personal Digital Archiving 2015 in NYC — “Call for Papers” Deadline Approaching

The Personal Digital Archiving Conference 2015 will take place in New York City for the first time. The conference will be hosted by our NDIIPP and NDSA partners at New York University’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program April 24-26, 2015. Presentation submissions for Personal Digital Archiving are due Monday, December 8th, 2014 by 11:59 […]

New FADGI Report: Creating and Archiving Born Digital Video

As part of a larger effort to explore file formats, the Born Digital Video subgroup of the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative Audio-Visual Working Group is pleased to announce the release of a new four-part report, “Creating and Archiving Born Digital Video.” This report has already undergone review by FADGI members and invited colleagues including […]

Comparing Formats for Video Digitization

The following is a guest post by Carl Fleischhauer, a Digital Initiatives Project Manager in the Office of Strategic Initiatives. FADGI format comparison projects. The Audio-Visual Working Group within the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative recently posted a comparison of a few selected digital file formats for consideration when reformatting videotapes. We sometimes call these […]

Collecting and Preserving Digital Art: Interview with Richard Rinehart and Jon Ippolito

As artists have embraced a range of new media and forms in the last century as the work of collecting, conserving and exhibiting these works has become increasingly complex and challenging. In this space, Richard Rinehart and Jon Ippolito have been working to develop and understand approaches to ensure long-term access to digital works. In […]

All the News That’s Fit to Archive

The following is a guest post from Michael Neubert, a Supervisory Digital Projects Specialist at the Library of Congress. The Library has had a web archiving program since the early 2000s.  As with other national libraries, the Library of Congress web archiving program started out harvesting the web sites of its national election campaigns, followed […]