Readers, Would You Care to Contribute Digital Preservation Web-based Resources?

While I was exploring the new National Archives and Records Administration Transcription Pilot Project this week, I thought about how many innovative, and frankly cool, crowdsourcing platforms the libraries and archives communities launched in the past year. The New York Public Library What’s on the Menu project, the NARA Citizen Archivist Dashboard, The University of Iowa Libraries Civil War Diaries Transcription Project  (which Trevor Owens blogged about last month), and Finland’s DigitalKoot project  are just a few of these websites.

Crowd, by James Cridland, on Flickr

Crowd, by James Cridland, on Flickr

Asking for contributions from the public, libraries and archives receive much needed man-power and collective knowledge from interested individuals to provide improved access to unique, historical collections.  Users volunteer their time and knowledge and gain highly interactive experiences. These are fun, social engagements because the website interfaces are great and the collections are interesting.

Browsing (and contributing) to some of these sites reminded me we’ve asked for our readers help on our own blog. We’ve had great conversations with and valuable contributions from our readers here, here and here.

I’ve been working on compiling a list of free, online resources that provide a good introduction to digital preservation geared for individuals.  We want a comprehensive list that will be valuable to assist librarians, archiving and information professionals who work with the public to gain knowledge and comfort with proving personal digital archiving information. Lisa Gregory recently blogged very well about discussing digital preservation with individuals while discussing the State Library of North Carolina’s tutorial on File Naming. (And this will be one of the resources on our list).

Here are some of the other resources on our list so far:

Digiman from Team Digital Preservation

Digiman from Team Digital Preservation



So, readers, would you like to contribute to this growing list? Do you know of a resource that would be useful? We’d like to hear about it from you. Please comment here or drop us an email at Thanks!


  1. Inge Angevaare
    January 28, 2012 at 7:26 am

    Hi Erin,
    Great initiative to start compiling lists of resources and bringing them together. There is so much information out there but it is scattered in a thousand places.

    I have just started a resources center on the Dutch DP Coalition’s website ( that is all about bringing together what is out there.

    Because of the language barrier I may not be able to contribute much to your list, but the Dutch read English quite well, so can I link to yours? Is it online somewhere?

    Best, Inge

  2. Erin Engle
    January 30, 2012 at 5:10 pm

    Hi Inge,
    Thanks for your comment! It’s very true that there’s so much information about preserving digital materials available online — and linking to relevant resource lists is one way to bring it all together. We’d be pleased if you’d link to ours from your resource center.

    We plan to pull our list together with the suggestions we get here (PLUG, PLUG). We’ll publish it online in the next couple of weeks, and of course, announce it on this blog. I’ll let you know when it’s up too.


  3. Erin Engle
    March 2, 2012 at 4:54 pm

    Hi Inge (and others),
    Here is the resources page we put together as part of the Personal Digital Archiving Day kit we recently published.

    As always, we are looking for suggestions for new web resources!

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