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The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope: April 18 Lecture with NASA’s Dr. Julie McEnery

Blazars, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts, dark matter, behind-the-limb solar flares, black holes, micro black holes, Fermi bubbles, and antimatter!  The Science, Technology and Business Division’s NASA/Goddard lecture series begins its eleventh season with “The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope:  Opening a Window on the Extreme Universe.”  Julie McEnery, Fermi Project Scientist and an astrophysicist in the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, will take the audience on a journey of the energetic Universe from their seats in the Pickford Theater, James Madison Building, on Tuesday, April 18 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST), which launched in June 2008, has provided its team all kinds of marvelous discoveries, and major improvements to methods for processing the observations have yielded an expanded, higher-quality set of data that has allowed astronomers to develop the most detailed census of the sky ever made at extreme energies.  FGST is an international (France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, U.S.) multi-agency space observatory with two main instruments. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the primary instrument which surveys the entire sky every three hours, and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is a complementary instrument which studies gamma-ray bursts. The development of the GBM and analysis of its observational data is a collaborative effort between the National Space Science and Technology Center in the U.S. and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Germany.  It can detect gamma-rays at both low and high energies.  The homepage for the Fermi mission is: https://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Gamma-rays are the highest-energy form of light, with a wavelength less than one tenth of a nanometer, and produced by the universe’s most energetic phenomena.  At least 12 of the sources on the new sky map produce gamma-rays with energies exceeding a trillion times the energy of visible light!

For inquiries about this program, contact Stephanie Marcus at 202-707-1192, or the division office at 202-707-1212.  Individuals requiring accommodations for this event are requested to contact 202-707-6362 or [email protected] .

The lecture will be later broadcast on the library’s webcast page and YouTube channel “Topics in Science” playlist.

What’s for Lunch: 2017 Earth and Space Science Talks at the Library of Congress, Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the ST&B Division

Lecture series coordinators Sean Bryant and Stephanie Marcus, Science, Technology and Business Division, contributed to this blog post. Spring has arrived, and with that, we are getting ready to kick off our annual Earth and Space Science lecture series, now in its eleventh year.  The series is a partnership between the NASA Goddard Space Flight […]

An American in Orbit: The Story of John Glenn

This post was authored by Sean Bryant, Science Reference & Research Specialist in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress. Fifty five years ago this week John Hershel Glenn Jr. rode an Atlas rocket into a cloudy February morning. In his Mercury space capsule Friendship 7, Glenn became the third person, […]

Hidden Figures No More: African American Women in Space Exploration

Today’s post was written by Denise Dempsey a Science Reference Librarian. The recent release of the new film Hidden Figures, based on the book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly, presents a great opportunity to learn more about the contributions of African American women to the Space Race and to space exploration. The […]

Revisiting the Apollo 17 Landing Site with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: December 6 Lecture with NASA Lunar Geologist Dr. Noah Petro

This post was authored by Stephanie Marcus, Science Reference Librarian in the Science, Technology, and Business Division. At 12:33 a.m. on December 7, 1972, Apollo 17 lifted off in the Florida night on a Saturn V rocket carrying Gene Cernan, Ron Evans, and Jack Schmitt on the final Apollo Moon mission.  On December 11, while […]

The Future of Planetary Surface Exploration: October 19th Lecture with NASA Research Scientist Kelsey Young, Ph.D.

Did you ever wonder what equipment a rock hound in space would bring along? On October 19, planetary geologist Dr. Kelsey Young will present “The Future of Planetary Surface Exploration,” where she will highlight the development of portable tools and technology that will accompany future astronauts. Dr. Young is a research scientist at NASA Goddard […]

A Space Weather Report: September 29 Lecture with NASA’s Dr. Alex Young

On September 29, Dr. C. Alex Young will present “A Space Weather Report: Preparing Space Explorers for Bad Weather throughout the Solar System.” As the Associate Director of Science for the Heliophysics Science Division at Goddard Space Flight Center, Dr. Young specializes in studying space weather and solar storms and oversees education and public outreach. […]

Attention Science Teachers! This One is for You!

The Library of Congress web site has a wealth of resources that may be helpful to you and to your students. Here are just a few suggestions… Your first stop should be the Science Reference Section’s web page. One fun resource you will see is their Everyday Mysteries project with “mysteries” like Why is it […]

The Science of Interstellar: May 3 Lecture with Dr. Jeremy Schnittman

The public is invited to a free talk called “The Science of Interstellar: Life on Planets Around Black Holes” with Dr. Jeremy Schnittman in the Pickford Theater on third floor of the Madison Building on Tuesday, May 3, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.. Jeremy Schnittman is a research astrophysicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight […]

New Horizons: Journey to Pluto and Beyond, subject of Dec. 8 lecture

Pluto has become one of our most favorite bodies in the solar system, perhaps gaining increased appreciation after it was demoted from a full-sized planet to dwarf planet in 2006 and thus decreasing our solar system planet count to eight planets. A significant portion of Pluto’s mass is icy material and so it is often referred […]