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Broccoli, Opossum, and Gingerbread: Presidential Food

Today’s post is written by science librarian and culinary specialist Alison Kelly. She has provided her expertise in a number of Inside Adams blog posts related to food history and cooking such as Early American Beer, and Early Mixology Books. Abraham Lincoln liked gingerbread cookies, William Howard Taft enjoyed roast opossum, and Ronald Reagan always […]

Hidden Figures No More: African American Women in Space Exploration

Today’s post was written by Denise Dempsey a Science Reference Librarian. The recent release of the new film Hidden Figures, based on the book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly, presents a great opportunity to learn more about the contributions of African American women to the Space Race and to space exploration. The […]

Emily Greene Balch: Economist, Sociologist, Pacifist, and Nobel Laureate

The month of January marks the birthday of Emily Greene Balch (1867-1961), an American economist, sociologist, political scientist, and pacifist who rose to prominence during and after World War I. Balch began her career as a faculty member at Wellesley College in 1896 and became a full professor in 1913. As an academic, Balch studied […]

The School Garden Army in the First World War

This guest post was written by Constance Carter, the previous head of Science Reference who now volunteers here at the Library. As the seed catalogs replace the Christmas catalogs, our thoughts turn to gardens and gardening. In 2017, gardening occupies an important place in the 100th anniversary of World War I. The Library’s collection of […]

The Potato Transformed: Norwegian Lefse

This post was authored by Stephanie Marcus, Science Reference & Research Specialist, in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress. She is also author of the blog post “Kebabs, Kabobs, Shish Kebabs, Shashlyk, and: Chislic.” I considered writing my December blog post about leeches and bloodletting, but decided that wouldn’t be […]

Fifty Years of Flight: L’Aérophile Collection

In the past, we have mentioned the L’Aérophile Collection in blog posts such as “Come Fly Away with Me, Courtesy of Wilbur and Orville” and “Flights of Fantasy and Fact: Man-made Wings in Literature and History.” However, there is much more to this collection. L’Aérophile Collection is devoted to the early years of aviation history […]

A.C. Gilbert’s Successful Quest to Save Christmas

When World War I broke out in 1914, President Wilson decided that the U.S. would not at that time join the Allies but would instead remain on the sidelines.  However, in 1916 he did establish the Council of National Defense which was composed of government officials that would coordinate resources and industry if necessary. When […]

The Patient’s Role in Advancing Cancer Research and Participation in Clinical Trials: Panel Discussion on Cancer Moonshot, December 15th, 2016

This post was authored by Tomoko Steen, PhD, Science Research Specialist, in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress The public is invited to a free panel discussion with representatives of the White House Moonshot Cancer Task Force and other organizations interested in cancer research on Thursday, December 15th regarding the […]

Revisiting the Apollo 17 Landing Site with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: December 6 Lecture with NASA Lunar Geologist Dr. Noah Petro

This post was authored by Stephanie Marcus, Science Reference Librarian in the Science, Technology, and Business Division. At 12:33 a.m. on December 7, 1972, Apollo 17 lifted off in the Florida night on a Saturn V rocket carrying Gene Cernan, Ron Evans, and Jack Schmitt on the final Apollo Moon mission.  On December 11, while […]