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Ancient Sasanian Empire Subject of June Symposium

The Sasanian Empire, which ruled much of Central and Western Asia for over 400 years (224-651 CE), will be the subject of a symposium, “From Oxus to Euphrates: the Sasanian Empire,” to be held from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 7th , in Northeast Pavilion of the Thomas Jefferson Building, located at 10 First Street S.E., Washington, DC. The symposium is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.

This symposium is organized by the African and Middle Eastern Division at the Library of Congress, in cooperation with the Iranian-American Alumni of the Alborz High School. It is part of an annual series of symposia on the ancient civilizations of the Near East organized by AMED. The videos of previous years’ symposia are accessible from the AMED homepage.

Here is the detailed symposium program. If you are in Washington, DC, please come and attend this program! The symposium will also be recorded and made available later for online viewing.

Click here for press release.

Inquiring Minds: Researching Jewish Cuisine at the Library of Congress

(The following is a repost of an interview conducted by Wendi Maloney, Office of Communications. This interview originally appeared on the Library of Congress Blog.) Joan Nathan is the author of 11 cookbooks, including “King Solomon’s Table: A Culinary Exploration of Jewish Cooking from Around the World,” published in April. Her previous cookbook, “Quiches, Kugels […]

Thinking of May Flowers: Focus on the Ottoman Turkish Collections

(The following is a post by Joan Weeks, Head, Near East Section and Turkish Specialist, African and Middle Eastern Division.) With Mother’s Day just around the corner, thoughts of flowers come naturally to people’s minds. Often, they ask what is this flower or where does it originate. If they inquire about the tulip, one of […]

Gathered Around the Seder Table: Images from the Passover Haggadah

(The following is a cross-post by Sharon Horowitz, reference librarian in the Hebraic Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division. It originally appeared on the Library of Congress blog.) Exodus 23:15 tells us that Passover should be celebrated in the spring. The rabbis understood this to mean it was their job to maintain the […]

Her Magazine, Her Voice: Foremothers of Women’s Journals in Africa and the Middle East

(The following is a joint post by Angel Batiste, Ann Brener, Anchi Hoh, and Fawzi Tadros in the African and Middle Eastern Division.) The history of women in Africa and the Middle East has often been told as addenda to incessant wars, political turmoil, and social injustice. If women’s voices could be heard, what story […]

Love Songs from the Middle East: A Valentine’s Day Celebrated with Poems from the Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish Collections

Poetry was the theme of a special program, “Love Songs from the Middle East: A Valentine’s Day Extravaganza with Poems from the Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish,” held in the African and Middle Eastern Division Reading Room of the Library of Congress. Through dramatic readings, the division’s very own area specialists journeyed with their audience […]

Africana Historic Postcard Collection

(The following is a post by Angel D. Batiste, Area Specialist, African and Middle Eastern Division.) After European powers met at the event called the Berlin Conference in 1884-85 to negotiate and formalize claims to African territory, nations in Africa faced European imperialist conquest and eventual colonization. By 1900 most of the entire African continent, […]

The Book of Khalid: An Arab-American Tale

(The following is a post by Muhannad Salhi, Arab World Specialist, Near East Section, African and Middle Eastern Division.) “Orientals” says he, “seldom adventure into that region of fancy and fabrication so alluring to European and American writers; for, like the eyes of huris, our vanity is soft and demure. This then is a book […]

Princess Tanya Comes to Washington: A Chanukah Story for the Library of Congress

(The following is a post by Ann Brener, Hebraic area specialist in the Library’s African and Middle Eastern Division.) This Chanukah, it will be exactly one hundred years since a Jewish artist in revolution-torn Moscow presented his young stepdaughter, Tanya, with a wonderful Chanukah gift: a hand-lettered Russian fairytale in which the little girl herself […]