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Using the Kislak Collection to Study the Early Americas

This week the Kluge Center extended the application deadline for Kislak Fellowships until October 31. These unique fellowships support research related to the discovery, contact, and colonial periods, particularly (but not exclusively) in Florida, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica using The Jay I. Kislak Collection. The Kislak Collection is an extraordinary trove of materials. It includes: […]

The Kazakh Famine of the 1930s

As a Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress, historian Sarah Cameron researched a book project on famine in Kazakhstan, 1930-33. She sat down with Jason Steinhauer to discuss this understudied chapter in Soviet history. Hi, Sarah. Tell us briefly about the Kazakh famine of 1930-33. The Kazakh famine was the defining event in the […]

The Idea of Peace in the Qur’an

The following is a guest post by Dr. Juan Cole, 2016 Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South. In contemporary debates on the roots of Muslim radicalism and the character of the religion, it is important to go back to the Muslim scripture or Qur’an (sometimes spelled Koran). Like the Bible, the Qur’an […]

Theories on the Origins of the Life: An Interview with Astrobiology Chair Nathaniel Comfort

In March, Astrobiology Chair Nathaniel Comfort interviewed four pioneering scientists about their roles in developing key models for the origins of life. The program titled “The Origins of the RNA World,” was part of Comfort’s year-long residency at the Kluge Center working on a book project about the genomic revolution’s impact on origins of life […]

Meet the 2016 Kluge Fellows

We at the Kluge Center are very pleased to announce our 2016 Kluge Fellows. This diverse group of scholars hails from institutions across the U.S. as well as one scholar from Ireland and one scholar from Russia. They represent the disciplines of political science, romance languages, modern language and literature, art history, foreign affairs, and […]

Lincoln and the Supreme Court

We should think about the Supreme Court not as a separate and isolated institution, but rather as an integral and interconnected part of the federal political apparatus in the 19th century. –Rachel Shelden In her lecture “Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. Supreme Court, and the Politics of Slavery“, historian Rachel Shelden examined Lincoln’s relationship with the […]

Law, Religion, and Liberty: A Conversation with John Witte, Jr.

Members of the Scholars Council are appointed by the Librarian of Congress to advise on matters related to scholarship at the Library, with special attention to the Kluge Center and the Kluge Prize. The Council includes distinguished scholars, writers, researchers, and scientists. “Insights” is featuring some of the work of this highly-accomplished group of thinkers. […]

Re-Imagining the Amazon

If you think about the way people occupied space then and think about the way people occupy space now, we might be able to come up with better strategies for managing the Amazon. –Anna Browne Ribeiro In her lecture “Imagining the Amazon, European Colonialism and the Making of Modern Day Amazonia“, geoarchaeologist Anna Browne Ribeiro […]

A Conversation with Author and Literature Scholar Peter Brooks

A 2016 distinguished visiting scholar at the Library of Congress, comparative literature scholar Peter Brooks is writing and researching a new book on how novels relate to history and societal self-understanding, drawing in particular on Flaubert’s novel, “Sentimental Education.” At the Library of Congress, he has been using the collections of the European Reading Room […]