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Cross-Cultural Links in Modern Computing

“The humanistic inquiry and innovation may appear to be independent of one discipline to another. Yet they weave a more interconnected story as well as demonstrate the pervasiveness of digital technologies in modern culture.” -Jennifer Baum Sevec In her lecture “It From Bit: Cross-Cultural & Interdisciplinary Links in Modern Computing,” Kluge Staff Fellow Jennifer Baum […]

Medieval Manuscripts at the Library of Congress

“The possibility of [the] destruction of manuscripts makes accurate and thorough catalog description mandatory.” -Ilya Dines In his lecture “Medieval Manuscripts at the Library of Congress,” Kluge Fellow Ilya Dines discussed his experience cataloging medieval manuscripts at the Library and the importance of the Library’s collection. The Library holds hundreds of medieval manuscripts from a […]

How a Scholar Uses Her Ph.D. to Combat Corruption Around the World

In 2012 and 2013, Nieves Zúñiga was an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Fellow at The John W. Kluge Center, researching a project titled “Indigenous Struggles over Recognition in Bolivia: Contesting Evo Morales’s Discourse of Internal Decolonization.” Today, she is putting her knowledge of Bolivian society to use as part of the EU-funded project […]

Using the Kislak Collection to Study the Early Americas

This week the Kluge Center extended the application deadline for Kislak Fellowships until October 31. These unique fellowships support research related to the discovery, contact, and colonial periods, particularly (but not exclusively) in Florida, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica using The Jay I. Kislak Collection. The Kislak Collection is an extraordinary trove of materials. It includes: […]

The Kazakh Famine of the 1930s

As a Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress, historian Sarah Cameron researched a book project on famine in Kazakhstan, 1930-33. She sat down with Jason Steinhauer to discuss this understudied chapter in Soviet history. Hi, Sarah. Tell us briefly about the Kazakh famine of 1930-33. The Kazakh famine was the defining event in the […]

The Idea of Peace in the Qur’an

The following is a guest post by Dr. Juan Cole, 2016 Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South. In contemporary debates on the roots of Muslim radicalism and the character of the religion, it is important to go back to the Muslim scripture or Qur’an (sometimes spelled Koran). Like the Bible, the Qur’an […]

Theories on the Origins of the Life: An Interview with Astrobiology Chair Nathaniel Comfort

In March, Astrobiology Chair Nathaniel Comfort interviewed four pioneering scientists about their roles in developing key models for the origins of life. The program titled “The Origins of the RNA World,” was part of Comfort’s year-long residency at the Kluge Center working on a book project about the genomic revolution’s impact on origins of life […]

Meet the 2016 Kluge Fellows

We at the Kluge Center are very pleased to announce our 2016 Kluge Fellows. This diverse group of scholars hails from institutions across the U.S. as well as one scholar from Ireland and one scholar from Russia. They represent the disciplines of political science, romance languages, modern language and literature, art history, foreign affairs, and […]