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Ministers of the Brazilian Federal Supreme Court Visit – Pic of the Week

On Tuesday, November 8, Minister Gilmar Mendes, Minister Teori Zavascki and Minister José Antonio Dias Toffoli of the Brazilian Federal Supreme Court visited the Law Library of Congress. Minister Mendes is also the current president of the Brazilian Superior Electoral Tribunal, and Minister Zavascki is the vice-president.

Brazilian Justices

(From left to right) Minister Teori Zavascki, Mr. Eduardo Soares, Minister Gilmar Mendes and Minister José Antonio Dias Toffoli. Photo by Beatriz Haspo

The Brazilian Federal Supreme Court (equivalent to the United States Supreme Court) is the highest court in Brazil. The Court is entrusted with the responsibility of safeguarding the Brazilian Constitution as well as functioning as a court of review. The Superior Electoral Tribunal is a specialized court dedicated to electoral law issues and the organization and supervision of elections in the country.

The Ministers met with Senior Foreign Law Specialist Eduardo Soares who serves as the Law Library’s Brazilian law specialist; covering the laws of Brazil and also the laws of Portuguese speaking countries. Nathan Dorn, the Law Library’s rare book curator, provided the ministers with a rare book presentation.

Female Students Offered Special Housing Assistance in Japan

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and several other Asian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Sayuri has previously written blog posts about testing of older drivers in Japan, sentencing of parents who kill children, English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws […]

New Report Explains Egyptian Laws Related to Addressing Sexual Violence

The following is a guest post by George Sadek, a senior legal research analyst at the Law Library of Congress. George has contributed a number of posts to this blog, including posts on Egypt’s new antiterrorism law, the legal processes available to imprisoned journalists in Egypt, the trial of Seif al Islam al Gaddafi, constitutional […]

The Law Library Blog, In Custodia Legis, Named to ABA Journal’s Blawg 100 for Third Time

We are excited that once again In Custodia Legis has been recognized as one of the top 100 best blogs for a legal audience out of more than 4,000 in the ABA Journal’s Blawg Directory.  We were first included in the ABA Journal’s 8th Annual Blawg 100 in 2014.  Then we were fortunate to be listed again […]

Edith Sampson – Pic of the Week

Saturday, December 3, marks the fifty-fourth anniversary of the day that Edith Spurlock Sampson was sworn in as the first African-American female judge. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1901, she graduated from high school and the New York University School of Social Work. One of her professors at the NYU School of Social Work, Columbia […]

Music and the Law, Part 1

The following post is cross posted on the In the Muse: Performing Arts Blog. As much as I love Christmas carols, I’m usually tired of them by mid-December as they seem to have been playing continuously since before Thanksgiving.  Well, it’s the Law Library to the rescue.  We polled our staff for their favorite songs about […]

An Interview with Carla Davis-Castro, Librarian

Today’s interview is with Carla Davis-Castro.  Carla is a librarian who has been working on our Indigenous Law Portal. Describe your background. I am a Salvadoran American from North Carolina who loves living in DC. In the year and a half I have been at the Library of Congress, I have moved from the Congressional Research Service to […]

Delicious, but Deadly: Should Fugu Liver be Served in Japan?

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and several other Asian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Sayuri has previously written blog posts about testing of older drivers in Japan, sentencing of parents who kill children, English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws […]