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Law Library to Commemorate Constitution Day with Discussion on Religious Freedom

In commemoration of Constitution Day, the Law Library of Congress will host a discussion about the importance of religious liberty in America and its historical connection to the U.S. Constitution with Princeton University professor of jurisprudence Robert P. George and Supreme Court correspondent Jess Bravin of The Wall Street Journal.

DrGeorge 2014

Robert P. George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and Director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton. Photo Courtesy of Robert P. George

The discussion will take place at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, September 16, in the Montpelier Room, located on the sixth floor of the Library’s James Madison Memorial Building, 101 Independence Avenue S.E., Washington, D.C. The event is free and open to the public; tickets are not required.

This public event will serve as the Law Library’s annual commemoration of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day – a U.S. federal observance to commemorate the signing of the Constitution, and “recognize all who, by coming of age or by naturalization, have become citizens.” Constitution Day was established by Congress in 2004 to recognize the ratification of the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787.

Jess Bravin_Constitution Day2015

Jess Bravin is Supreme Court Correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. Photo by Ben Bravin

George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and founder and director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. He is also a visiting professor at Harvard Law School and vice-chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.

Bravin has covered the Supreme Court for The Wall Street Journal since 2005, following postings as the paper’s United Nations correspondent and editor of The Wall Street Journal/California weekly. Prior to joining the Journal, Bravin wrote for newspapers including the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Washington Post, and for magazines ranging from Harper’s Bazaar to Spy.

We hope you can join us! For those not able to attend the program, we will have a member of the In Custodia Legis team live tweet the event via Twitter@LawLibCongress, using #ConstitutionDay.

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