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The Law Library Commemorated Constitution Day with a Book Talk by Professor Michael J. Klarman

The Law Library of Congress commemorated Constitution Day a little early this year with a book talk by Harvard Law Professor Michael J. Klarman on September 12th. Professor Klarman discussed his book, The Framers’ Coup: The Making of the United States Constitution. Prof. Klarman referred to the Philadelphia convention as a coup because the delegates defied their instructions in crafting a new design for a federal government that was much more nationalist and anti-populist in design than the Articles of the Confederation. Despite the Federalists’ success in crafting a strong federal government, the document still had to be ratified by nine of the thirteen states to become operative. Many of these states had enacted populist legislation, such as debtor relief acts, earlier in the decade which was antithetical to the Framers’ view of government. How did the Federalists overcome Anti-Federalist objections to the new model of government? Watch Prof. Klarman discuss how a combination of guile and good fortune on the part of the Federalists led to the ratification of the United States Constitution, a document that has endured to become one of the world’s longest surviving, written charters of government.

Acta de Independencia de Centro América — Pic of the Week

This is a guest post by Hazel Ceron, external relations assistant with the Law Library Office of External Relations. On this day 196 years ago (September 15, 1821), the Acta de Independencia de Centro América proclaimed independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua from Spain. In celebration of the 196th anniversary, today’s […]

When Were Marriages Between Cousins Banned in China?

In my previous blog post, How Degrees of Kinship Are Calculated Under Chinese Law?, it was mentioned that cousin marriage is banned by the People’s Republic of China (PRC) Marriage Law. In fact, the ban has not been there for very long: it officially appeared in the Law when it was revised in 1980. Marriage between […]

A Congress.gov Interview with Adrienne Keys, Specialist in Legislative Information Systems Management

This week’s interview is with Adrienne Keys, specialist in legislative information systems management within the Congressional Research Service (CRS) of the Library of Congress. Describe your background. I started my government career at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History. I worked first as an unpaid intern while I finished my bachelor’s degree at George […]

2017 AALL Annual Meeting: Our Presentation on Enhancements in Government Legislative Websites

Tariq, Andrew and I, along with other Law Library colleagues, recently participated in the 110th American Association of Law Librarians (AALL) Annual Meeting and Conference.  If you haven not done so yet, check out Andrew’s post on the experiences of our colleagues at the conference. In addition to attending many of the wonderful programs offered, the […]

Congress.gov Tip, Top, and New for September 2017

Last month kicked off the first Congress.gov Tip, Top, and New post. Today, we’re bringing you the new Congress.gov enhancements for September, as well as a search tip and the latest most-viewed bills. Search Tip Adrienne Keys continues to share helpful search tips on Congress.gov.  A recent tip was to remind users that the default search operator […]

Middlemarch and the Rocky Road to the Reform Act of 1832

I spent my summer vacation at Dickens Universe on the University of California Santa Cruz campus. In anticipation of the bicentenary of George Eliot’s birth, this year’s book was Middlemarch, rather than the usual novel by Dickens.  I had promised the blog team that I would write a post on Middlemarch after attending this literary fest. […]

Religious Matrimonial Laws in Selected Middle East and African Countries

I previously blogged about Jewish religious law that governs marriages and divorces of Jews in Israel. I also blogged about Jewish divorces in other countries. This time I asked my colleagues in the Global Legal Research Directorate for examples of countries that recognize the application of religious matrimonial laws. In this blog post I will highlight whether and the […]

Law Library to Commemorate Constitution Day with Book Talk

At 230 years old, the United States Constitution is the oldest surviving written charter of government in the world. The “Framers” signed the Constitution on September 17, 1787. The document defines the powers and limits of the executive, judicial and legislative branches of government, and the fundamental rights of all Americans. The Law Library of […]