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Help Finding Comparative and International Law

The following is a guest post by Shameema Rahman, Legal Reference Specialist in our Public Services Directorate. The Law Library’s Multinational Collections Database is now the Global Legal Information Catalog (GLIC). GLIC is a research tool for the Library of Congress Collections that interfaces with our library catalog. Why do you need to use it? […]

Our First Century of Lawmaking and More

While I frequently mention THOMAS, I should point out that other parts of our website also feature legislative information, especially historic information.  We have one of the most complete collections of U.S. Congressional documents in their original format.  A Century of Lawmaking For a New Nation provides access to U.S. congressional documents and debates from […]

A Bill by Any Other Name

You might remember hearing about an “amendment in the nature of a substitute,” sometimes referred to as a “vehicle bill,” during the passing of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (H.R. 3590).  An amendment in the nature of a substitute is an amendment that would strike out the entire text of a bill after […]

Maybe a Dingo Killed the Baby

It’s a phrase that has entered into popular culture and one that people might use to demonstrate the Australian (“Austrayan”) accent but, just as Kirk Lazarus said in Tropic Thunder, “the dingo’s got my baby” (and variations on this quote) really does come from a true story, and a baby really did die.  The cause […]

Where to Watch Congress Online

This has been a great year for watching Congress online!  C-SPAN launched their Video Library .  It is an incredible resource that contains: …[e]very C-SPAN program aired since 1987, now totaling over 160,000 hours, …in the C-SPAN Archives and [is] immediately accessible through the database and electronic archival systems developed and maintained by the C-SPAN […]

Gun Laws – Truly Exceptional Circumstances Must Exist to Avoid Minimum Sentencing

As Kelly said in a previous post, there are certain cases that attract our attention for both their quirkiness and deeper societal meanings.  With several hundred years of cases, there are many, many quirky ones across my jurisdictions.  There has been one particular case that has stuck with me for the past few years as […]

Tweeting Away

My how time flies.  I can’t believe it was almost a year ago that we here at the Law Library of Congress entered into the twitterverse. Last October, Matt announced our @LawLibCongress account: The purpose of the Twitter feed, according to the Law Library, is “to engage Members of Congress, their staff, other law libraries, […]