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THOMAS is Now on Science.gov

Last week I discussed THOMAS off of THOMAS, and this week I’m happy to announce there is another location to add to the list: science.gov.  The 111th and 112th Congresses have been added to the basic search:

By including THOMAS in your search, you will be guided to the “Bill Summary & Status” containing information about bills and amendments on your topic. The summary and status information includes: sponsor(s); cosponsor(s); official, short and popular titles; floor/executive actions; detailed legislative history; Congressional Record page references; bill summary; committees of referral; reporting and origin; subcommittees of referral; links to other committee information provided by the House of Representatives; amendment descriptions (and text, when available); subjects (indexing terms assigned to each bill); a link to the full text versions and if the bill has been enacted into law, a link to the full text of the law on the Government Printing Office Web site (in both text and .PDF formats).

Legislative information is automatically included in all Basic Searches on Science.gov.  If you wish to search legislative information specifically, or if you want to exclude it, you may use the Advanced Search to mark/unmark the appropriate checkboxes.  To add THOMAS to your Alerts, you must login to your Alerts account and manually add it to your menu of selections.

Science.gov pulls together 200 million pages of government science information.  Now you’ll be able do scientific research and see relevant legislation all in one location.

Like I said last week, I really like additional sources enabling the public to learn about legislation.  And now there’s one more to add to the list!


  1. Ronique Breaux
    January 31, 2011 at 8:57 am

    We will get started..thanks!

  2. Rey Moore
    January 31, 2011 at 4:31 pm

    A new frontier.

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