{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

An Interview With Cynthia Jordan, Senior Writer-Editor at the Law Library of Congress

This week’s interview is with Cynthia Jordan, Senior Writer-Editor at the Law Library of Congress.

Describe your background

I am a Maryland native but I grew up in New York City. I have also lived in a number of other places including London, U.K., Barbados and Texas.

What is your academic/professional history?

I have a BA from City College of New York, a JD from the University of Texas at Austin, and have been licensed to practice law in both Texas and Maryland.  I practiced law for over 20 years before coming to the Law Library of Congress.

How would you describe your job to other people?

I am a Writer-Editor, which involves a wide range of duties.  I conduct research, write speeches and reports, and edit documents for the Law Librarian of Congress and other Law Library managers; coordinate conferences; make presentations about the Law Library; serve as project manager for the “Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation Program on Demography, Technology and Criminal Justice at the Library of Congress,” and co-project manager of the Law Library of Congress Reading Room Management Training Program.

Why did you want to work at the Law Library of Congress?

The Law Library of Congress is a bastion of knowledge, the premier law library in the United States.  I’ve always loved words, spoken and written, and libraries have always been one of my most favorite places to spend my time.  To get to work in the Law Library allows me to express my love of words, learn as much as I can make room in my brain to hold, and to have access to some of the greatest minds in the country – my colleagues.  In working at the Law Library, I get to combine my two great loves – the law and learning – every day, in ways that working in the area of litigation enhances, but by itself doesn’t really allow in such a day to day manner.

What is the most interesting fact you’ve learned about the Law Library and/or the Library of Congress?

I’ve learned many interesting facts about the Law Library of Congress, but I must say the one that sticks with me is that the Law Library continues to be relevant in this new age of technology, and indeed, that it is leading the way in creating new ways to provide access to the wealth of information contained within its walls.  The Law Library of Congress is showing the world that change is indeed good.  I also find the symbolism behind the statues in the Main Reading Room of the Library of Congress fascinating.

What’s something most of your co-workers do not know about you?

Most do not know that I garden, that I grow vegetables for my table, and that I will be a gourmet chef in my next life.

 

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.