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Career Development Program Graduation – Pic of the Week

Congratulations to Barbara Moore and Agata Tajchert, recent graduates of the Library of Congress Career Development Program. The following is a guest post by Agata, Law Library Technician in our Collection Services Division, about her experience.

This past Wednesday, April 4th, nineteen of my classmates and I graduated from the Career Development Program, Group 10. This award-winning program was created by the Library of Congress’s own Human Resources Services/Workforce Performance and Development Team.  Completing this program was an incredible journey, which we were on together for twelve weeks. It teaches skills and techniques, but it goes deeper. It touches all levels of a person’s psychological and intellectual being, and in my opinion, provides a better chance for more permanent improvement and instills ongoing developmental practices.

Barbara Moore, David Mao, Kurt Carroll, Agata Tajchert (photo by Agnieszka Pukniel)

We started with a personality evaluation to better understand ourselves, and teamwork training to learn about understanding others. We took tours of the different parts of the Library of Congress; learned about the budget process and the Library’s strategic plan; and how the Library of Congress fits within the greater federal government. We refreshed existing skills and learned new skills such as: writing, public speaking, and networking. We were also given a chance to create or improve our working relationships with our supervisors through weekly check-in meetings.

I always appreciated the Library of Congress, but participating in this program gave me the bigger picture; and seeing it made me truly proud to be a part of this institution. I realized that in addition to working here I also identify with the Library’s goals and mission. I discovered how much I truly enjoy working here and want to make a difference.

The other Law Library participant, Barbara Moore, had very similar sentiments. She said:

Let me start by saying that I am very proud to have been selected to participate in the award-winning Career Development Program, Group 10.

Throughout the twelve week program I have gained such an enormous amount of knowledge about the Library’s resources and services; knowledge that I will carry with me each day to enhance my career development and to support the mission of the Law Library of Congress.

I would like to thank David Mao and the WPD Team for their support, encouragement and for their confidence in me.

It is a great feeling when suddenly all the pieces of the puzzle fall into place.  This is exactly how I feel right now. So my deepest thanks to the whole Workforce Performance and Development Team led by Kimberly Powell; to our presenters from both the Library of Congress and outside entities; and to my extremely talented and inspiring classmates. Thank you all!

5 Comments

  1. Jackie G.
    April 6, 2012 at 2:28 pm

    How do you get into the Career Development Program?

  2. Sharad Shah
    April 6, 2012 at 3:06 pm

    Jackie,

    The Career Development Program (CDP) is a 12-part course which is offered three times a year to LOC employees between GS-2 and GS-9 who have been at the LOC for over one year. Applications for the program are available online at http://www.loc.gov/extranet/cld/cdppilot.html

    Note that this year is filled up, but you can apply for next year (beginning January 2013). The deadline, I believe, is in September.

  3. Agata
    April 6, 2012 at 3:47 pm

    Sharad is one of the graduates too, so he knows what he’s talking about. Thanks, Sharad! :)

  4. Meg Lulofs Kuhagen
    April 6, 2012 at 4:05 pm

    Congratulations!

  5. Kristina Alayan
    April 7, 2012 at 2:49 pm

    Way to go, guys!!

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