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Global Legal Monitor: May Highlights

The top ten Global Legal Monitor (GLM) articles for May covered a wide array of interesting legal issues: War Crimes; Treatment of Animals; Immigration and Citizenship; Criminal Law and Procedure; Communications and electronic information; Labor; and Elections.

Below are the articles in the order of their popularity:

  1. Liberia: Human Rights
  2. South Korea: Permanent Dual Nationality Allowed after 60 Years
  3. Turkey: New Minimum Wage
  4. Mongolia: Election Law Amended, New Election System Adopted
  5. China: Amendment of Criminal Procedure Law
  6. Zambia: Draft Constitution to Include Press Freedom
  7. Belarus: Browsing Foreign Websites a Misdemeanor
  8. Trinidad and Tobago: Dangerous Dogs Act Finally to Come into Force
  9. Denmark: Retirement Age Raised
  10. France: Law on Immigration, Integration and Nationality

The Global Legal Monitor published a total of 50 articles in May covering a range of issues and countries.  Some of the many interesting articles featured included:

  • An article on a measure in the Netherlands to raise the country’s retirement age, currently set at 65, incrementally to 67 by 2023;
  • An article on a proposal in New Zealand to subsidize access to long-acting reversible contraception for women on welfare and girls of a certain age whose parents are on welfare; and
  • An article on a European Commission on Racism and Xenophobia report linking high unemployment and austerity measures in Counsel of Europe Member States to an increase in intolerance towards minorities.

More Global Legal Monitor articles are available at the Law Library website.  You can also sign up for email alerts or RSS feeds.  If you’re on Twitter, you can access some GLM articles through tweets via @LawLibCongress and #GlobalLegalMonitor.

Let us know which GLM articles you find interesting.

2 Comments

  1. Marie
    June 4, 2012 at 6:01 pm

    What both the U.K. and Trinidad and Tobago need is a non-breed-specific dangerous-dog ordinance. We responsible pit bull owners shudder every time one of these idiot laws appears. BTW, I’m a librarian and I’m over 65. I’m on my second pit bull, who sleeps in the bed with us, and hasn’t torn our throats out yet. Yes, she has means and oportunity, but no motive.

    If the dog owner were to be sentenced to manslaughter if his dog killed someone, there would be fewer problems and justice would be served.

    Any dog can be dangerous. Pit bulls as a group are very human-bonded, affectionate, eager to please, agile, and powerful for their size — a recipe for disaster in the wrong hands.

  2. John Roe
    June 5, 2012 at 4:05 pm

    I really enjoy the all the information, you are willing to share with the general public, this is amazing. I would like thank you all that Library of Congress. It is a great wieath if Knowledge.

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