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We have a New Look! Changes to the Law Library of Congress Website

This week we are releasing an updated look for the Law Library’s website.  From time to time, the Library changes its website design and features to make it more user-friendly and better functioning.  This release is more of a refreshment of the site as well as an update to its search function.

Screen shot of new Law Library homepage

Screen shot of old Law Library homepage

We welcome you to take a look at the refreshed site and give us your feedback by leaving comments on this post.  Take a look at some of the new and improved features, which include:

(1)   Page layout – You will notice the website pages are wider, offering more space for content and a cleaner look to the pages.

(2)   Improved search – The localized search for the site (see the search box under our logo to the left of the page) has switched to a new integrated and faceted approach.  The new search will allow users to refine their searches with facets, creating a search tool that is powerful and flexible.  Once a search term or phrase is entered, users will receive a custom map or breakdown (facets) of search results, such as format of content (PDF, webpage, book); dates; name of sites or collections (American Memory, Library of Congress, Library of Congress Catalog); contributors; subjects; languages, etc.  Once these auto-generated facets or limiters are created, you can use them to refine or clarify your query in one simple step.  For an example of the difference between the old search and new faceted search, see the screen shots below (Dred Scott was used as the search phrase).

Screen shot of new Law Library search for "Dred Scott"

Screen shot of old Law Library search for "Dred Scott"

As part of the search improvement process, we have a project underway to update the metadata for each page in order to take full advantage of the new faceted search.

(3)   Highlighting of content – Our homepage brings forward content authored by Law Library staff that focuses on global law and U.S. legal information.  Items include:

  • Current Legal Topics – A collection of guides and reports that provide legal commentary and recommended resources on issues and events with legal significance.
  • Global Legal Monitor (GLM) – Frequently updated, the GLM is an online publication covering legal news and developments from around the globe.
  • Guide to Law Online – This annotated portal includes links to primary and secondary sources of government and law from over 190 nations and the U.S.

(4)   New Law Library logo and left-hand navigation highlights – The Law Library’s new logo, featuring a tree with the scales of justice, appears on the website in the upper left-hand corner of each page.

The navigation terms on the left-hand side of each page have changed slightly.  We have renamed some of the categories to help simplify and clarify the navigation for users – “Research help” is now “Research & Reports”  and “Contact Us” is now “Submit a Request.”

Additionally, you can easily find links to all of our social media outlets (Facebook, Twitter – Law Library, Twitter – THOMAS, YouTube, iTunes U) and our most recent In Custodia Legis blog posts via the improved page organization.

Please take a look at our new website and our improved search function.  What do you think?

4 Comments

  1. A Nikhwai
    June 6, 2012 at 2:03 pm

    It looks great. Much more spacious as well. Thanks.

  2. lily
    October 26, 2012 at 7:31 pm

    i love this page very much

  3. John Roe
    February 21, 2013 at 7:03 pm

    This is a great new look, and is very open, which is also very good.

  4. Brian K
    March 19, 2013 at 4:18 am

    i really like this game, cannot get enough.

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