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Global Legal Monitor: September Highlights

The Global Legal Monitor (GLM) is a Law Library of Congress publication providing summaries on new legal developments around the world.  It is updated frequently and can be searched by author, topic and jurisdiction. Here is a list of the top ten most viewed GLM articles in September, including ones published about two years ago that remain popular […]

Being Well-informed: Congress.gov Training

This is a guest post by Judy Graves, Digital Projects Coordinator, Digital Reference Section and instructor, Introducing loc.gov, the monthly webinar series and Pamela Barnes Craig, Instruction/Reference Librarian. “Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government. . . .” Thomas Jefferson to Richard Price, Jan. 8, 1789 Believing wholeheartedly that […]

The First Iterative Update to Congress.gov

The three weeks since we introduced Congress.gov have flown by.  In my initial post on the new system, I mentioned that we will continue to enhance Congress.gov.  The first set of enhancements has gone live.  Jeanine has updated the About Congress.gov page to include: October 2012 Minor updates were made to the system that included: a […]

A Congress.gov Interview with Barry Priest, Web DevAdmin

This week’s interview is with Barry Priest, Web DevAdmin.  This is the third in the new series of interviews that focus on Library of Congress staff who contributed to Congress.gov. Describe your background. My degree is in Theater Design and Technology from Purdue University. That program allowed me the flexibility to pursue interests in CAD/3D rendering, computer science […]

The New Cyber Battlefield: Implications under International Law of Armed Conflict

The application of international law of armed conflict to cyber-warfare has been under intense discussion recently following the release of Stuxnet, a highly sophisticated computer worm and related malware which was reportedly developed by two technologically advanced countries. The Stuxnet release allegedly ruined centrifuges at Iran’s Natanz uranium enrichment facility. According to Reuters, Iran’s Revolutionary Guards had announced that that country was prepared […]

Capoeira: From Crime to Culture

The following is a guest post by Eduardo Soares, a Senior Foreign Law Specialist in the Global Legal Research Center of the Law Library of Congress.  Eduardo is a Brazilian attorney and provides research services relating to the laws of Portuguese-speaking jurisdictions. Portuguese explorers first made landfall in Brazil on April 22, 1500.  After the discovery, the […]

October Days of 1789 – Pic of the Week

After Tariq and Clare posted earlier this week on Sedition Law in England and India, I found myself thinking about revolutions.  Naturally the first thing that occurred to me was that today is the anniversary of one of the great events of the French Revolution, the March on Versailles.  You can see a contemporary account […]