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Global Legal Monitor: 2012 Highlights

For those of us who are global legal news buffs, 2012 was a great year.  I am speaking of the Global Legal Monitor (GLM), a Law Library of Congress publication which provides summaries on new legal developments around the world.  In 2012, GLM published 512 articles on a range of legal issues in various jurisdictions.

Of all the articles published in the GLM, some attracted particularly high traffic in 2012.  Below is the list of the 15 most viewed GLM articles for the year in the order of their popularity:

  1. Belarus: Browsing Foreign Websites a Misdemeanor
  2. South Korea: Permanent Dual Nationality Allowed after 60 Years
  3. Turkey: New Minimum Wage
  4. France: Law on Immigration, Integration and Nationality
  5. China: Amendment of Criminal Procedure Law
  6. China: Maternity Leave Extended from 90 Days to 98 Days
  7. Japan: Child Pornography Law Amendment Discussed
  8. Hong Kong: Minimum Wage Law Takes Effect
  9. Denmark: Retirement Age Raised
  10. China: Revision of Catalog of Industries for Foreign Investment
  11. Indonesia: Labor Law to Be Revised
  12. United States: New Jersey Supreme Court Revises Test for Admissibility of Eyewitness Identifications
  13. U.N. Human Rights Council: First Resolution on Internet Free Speech
  14. Japan: Stricter Sentences for Sex Offenders
  15. Italy: Renewable Energy Law Adopted

Do not forget to use the comments section to tell us which GLM articles you find interesting.

The Global Legal Monitor is updated frequently and you can access it a number of ways.  You can access articles by going to the Law Library website, via email alerts, or subscribing to the RSS feeds.  In addition, articles from this publication are often available through tweets through the Law Library twitter account, @lawlibcongress, by staff tweeting them, or by searching the hashtag #GlobalLegalMonitor.

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