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The Rule of Law in China: New Titles in Our Collection

On May 1 we celebrated Law Day 2013 here at the Law Library of Congress by presenting a panel discussion on the “Movement in America for Civil and Human Rights.”  For those who are not familiar with it, Law Day is a “national day to celebrate the rule of law and its contributions to the freedoms that Americans enjoy.”

The rule of law is also a crucial issue in the development of the Chinese legal system, which closely relates to other key issues of this rapidly changing country, including its sociopolitical stability and prospects of its economic growth.  The Chinese government recently underwent a leadership transition.  It remains to be seen whether the new leadership will live up to the goal of establishing Western-style rule of law and constitutionalism.

For readers interested in legal reform in China, here is a list of new books I’d like to highlight.  They are all in English, published in 2012 or later, and available at the Law Library of Congress for your use.  Of course, you can always search the whole collection by using the Library of Congress online catalog.

I would like to thank Sabrina Hsu, head of the Law Library’s stack services division, for her help in preparing this post.

Update: This was originally published as a guest post by Laney Zhang. The author information has been updated to reflect that Laney is now an In Custodia Legis blogger.

3 Comments

  1. Sergio Stone
    May 14, 2013 at 1:53 pm

    Very useful list of the latest ROL titles. Many thanks Laney!

  2. Laney
    May 14, 2013 at 3:01 pm

    Thanks for the prompt comment Sergio! Let me know what else we should get!

  3. Andrew Weber
    May 14, 2013 at 5:38 pm

    Thanks, Laney!

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