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Recent Webinar with Scholar-in-Residence, Orin Kerr

The following is a guest post by Cynthia Jordan, Senior Writer-Editor at the Law Library of Congress.

The Law Library of Congress recently hosted an online workshop as part of the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation program on Demography, Technology, and Criminal Justice at the Library of Congress.  The webinar took place over two days: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. and Wednesday, May 22, 2013 at 2:00 p.m.

The two-day webinar featured a panel discussion on the issues raised by the forthcoming work of Professor Orin S. Kerr, Law Library Scholar-in-Residence.  Professor Kerr’s draft work, “The Next Generation Privacy Act,” contends that Congress should repeal the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (18 USC 2510), which regulates government access to Internet records, and replace it with a new statute that addresses current technologies and privacy threats.

The panel comprised leading attorneys, academics and other eminent professionals whose work assists Congress in defining the new rules applicable to this emerging area of law.  Panelists included:

  •  Marc Zwillinger, a founding partner of ZwillGen PLLC, who regularly provides advice and counsel on issues related to the increasingly complex laws governing Internet practices, including issues related to Electronic Communications Privacy Act (“ECPA”), the Wiretap and Communication Acts, privacy, CAN-SPAM, FISA, spyware, adware, Internet gambling and adult-oriented content;
  • Richard Salgado, who serves both as Google’s Director for information security and law enforcement matters, and as a legal lecturer on computer crime and Internet business legal and policy issues at Stanford Law School;
  • Chris Soghoian, who is the Principal Technologist and a senior policy analyst with the Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU); and
  • James Dempsey, who serves as the Vice President for Public Policy at the Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT).

    Orin Kerr Responds to a Question from Marc Zwillinger.

 

Professor Kerr’s views sparked a spirited discussion on both days, as each panelist offered their comments on and suggested modifications to Professor Kerr’s draft.  Those attending the webinar (non-panelists) were also given an opportunity to pose questions and suggestions to Professor Kerr; and he graciously considered and responded to all questions posed.

The Law Library would like to thank all of whom attended the webinar and anticipates posting it on its website very soon.  So keep an eye on this space!!

We also look forward to seeing you at the final Guggenheim Lecture, scheduled for September 30, 2013, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Montpelier Room, on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building.  More information on this lecture will be made available as plans are finalized.

Acknowledgments:  The Law Library is grateful to the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation for its generous support of this program. The webinar was also made possible by the Law Library’s partnership with FEDLINK and would like to say thank you for its continued support of the Law Library’s mission.

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