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Connect with the Law Library of Congress at the American Association of Law Libraries Conference

It is that time of year again.  From July 13-16, law librarians from across the country gather to discuss best practices, enhance skills, and connect with new people and resources.  It is also a good time to connect with those of us who work at the Law Library of Congress and will be attending the conference.  This will be my third time to present at the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Annual Meeting.

Congress.gov uses responsive design to look great on any device

I am going to help law librarians learn to better engage with Congress.gov.  Tammie, Jeanine, and I are preparing to arm a room full of law librarians with knowledge about how to use the new system in our interactive presentation Please Turn Your Electronic Device On: Exploring Congress.gov.  We’ll be asking people to fire up their phones, tablets, and laptops, head to Congress.gov, and observe how the design magic (AKA responsive design) allows it to work on every device.  Then we will ask the audience to complete a series of legislative tasks that demonstrate each of the big updates to the system.

Hanibal, Tariq, and Kelly will be presenting Lifting the Veil: How to Effectively Research Foreign Customary Laws.  Hanibal covers 19 African jurisdictions and has previously blogged on In Custodia Legis about customary law:

many legal issues regarding African jurisdictions that are often a subject of inquiry, particularly those having to do with matters of personal status, are entirely or in part controlled by religious and/or customary rites.

You can hear details on customary law from him, Tariq, and Kelly after the keynote on Sunday at 11:15.  I have talked with all three of them about their presentation and am really looking forward to it.  In preparation for the presentation, they prepared three new Customary Law Research Guides: Africa, India, and New Zealand.

Look for us and other Law Library colleagues throughout the conference.

Before the 2011 conference in Philadelphia, we blogged about ways to meet our staff.  Afterwards we shared our lessons learned.  Last year in Boston, I took some photos of libraries there that Kelly blogged about and we also shared more lessons learned.

P.S. If you happen to be attending AALL 2013 and want to learn more about Responsive Web Design, there is a program on it too.

Update: the post has been updated to include links to new Customary Law Research Guides.

One Comment

  1. Rose
    July 9, 2013 at 12:15 pm

    Is there one place where individual state statutes and case law can be obtained on the web, or must each state be researched individually?

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