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Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2014

 

The poster for the exhibition, "A Day Like No Other," is displayed in the lobby of the Law Library's offices.

The poster for the exhibition, “A Day Like No Other,” is displayed in the lobby of the Law Library’s offices.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day will be observed as a federal holiday this year on Monday, January 20.  Christine wrote about Martin Luther King, Jr. Day back in 2011.  That post remains one of the most-visited pages on our blog.  Recently, Jeanine interviewed Chuck Verrill, who was present at the March on Washington in 1963.  Mr. Verrill served as the president of the Friends of the Law Library.

This week, the Library of Congress held a symposium of the photographers (and relatives of photographers no longer alive) whose works appear in the exhibition, “A Day Like No Other,” celebrating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. 

The Library recently extended the exhibition through May 31, so fans of photography may want to visit soon to view the iconic images.  Free and open to the public Monday to Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., the exhibition is on display in the Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground level of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. 

“A Day Like No Other” and its programming were made possible by the generous support of the J. J. Medveckis Foundation, the Friends of the Law Library of Congress, the Law Library Various Donors Gift Fund, Roberta I. Shaffer, and an anonymous donor to the Prints and Photographs Division.

One Comment

  1. David Wronko
    January 20, 2014 at 9:23 am

    On January 15, 2014 Mrs. Major Phillips once again provided Asbury Park Middle School with an incredible assembly dedicated to the memory of Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s leadership during the Civil Rights Movement and his ongoing promotion of equality, peace, and the end to violence was highly stressed at this assembly. In addition to the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., Phillips’ assembly also paid recognition to a man who was very similar or well connected to Dr. King and that was Nelson “Madiba” Mandela. It was made clear during this assembly that Nelson Mandela, who passed away on December 5, 2013, was a person who also stressed equality, peace, and the end of violence. This was seen when Nelson Mandela was released from prison and became president of South Africa where he stressed the importance that everyone regardless of race gets along.

    This assembly also had a guest speaker which was Mr. Don Covin. Mr. Don Covin, local educator, enforced the message of Dr. King’s holiday of equality, peace, and the end to violence through his speech to the students. During his speech students were very well attentive to hear what Mr. Covin had to tell them.

    In Remembrance: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. (JANUARY 15, 1929 – APRIL 4, 1968)
    In Remembrance: NELSON “MADIBA” MANDELA (JULY 18, 1918 – DECEMBER 5, 2013)

    The Assembly Credits’
    Welcome ……….. Annarah Harris, Mistress of Ceremony
    “Lift Every Voice and Sing” by James Weldon Johnson………. Mikayla Serrano
    Tribute to Nelson “Madiba” Mandela…………………..Veronica Vasquez
    Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around………………Mikayla Serrano
    Guest Speaker………………………….Mr. Don Covin
    Closing Remarks……………………………Dr. Antonio Lewis, Principal

    “If you can’t fly then run. If you can’t run then walk. If you can’t walk then crawl. But whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.” MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

    “Lift Every Voice and Sing” by James Weldon Johnson
    Lift every voice and sing, till earth and Heaven ring,
    Ring with the harmonies of liberty;
    Let our rejoicing rise, high as the listening skies,
    Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
    Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us,
    Sing a song full of hope that the present has brought us;
    Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,
    Let us march on till victory is won.”

    “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around”
    Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me ‘round,
    Turn me ‘round, turn me ‘round.
    Ain’t gonna let nobody, turn me ‘round.
    I’m gonna keep on a walking’; keep on a-talkin’,
    Ain’t gonna let segregation turn me ‘round,
    Turn me ‘round, turn me ‘round.
    Ain’t gonna let segregation turn me ‘round,
    I’m gonna keep on a walkin’, keep on a-talkin’.
    I’m gonna walk
    I’m gonna walk
    I’m gonna sing
    I’m gonna sing

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