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Official Gazettes: Afghanistan to Zimbabwe

While the United States does not publish an official gazette, most countries of the world do.  These primary law sources are invaluable for foreign legal research.  While no two countries’ gazettes are identical, most contain legislation, orders, regulations, statutory instruments, and international agreements.  Some even include decisions of courts and administrative agencies.  The currency of […]

New Law Library Reports Cover Access to Encrypted Communications and Intelligence Gathering

More and more internet traffic is encrypted. Encryption is a method of protecting electronic information by converting it into an unintelligible form (encoding) so that it can only be decoded with a key. Google stated in its latest transparency report that 85% of requests from around the world to Google’s servers used encrypted connections in […]

United States Treaties Added to the Law Library Website

We have added the United States Treaty Series, compiled by Charles I. Bevans, to our online digital collection.  This collection includes treaties that the United States signed with other countries from 1776 to 1949. The collection consists of 13 volumes: four volumes of multilateral treaties, eight volumes of bilateral treaties and one volume of an index. Multilateral […]

Murder as Statecraft

The following is a guest post by Peter Roudik, director of legal research at the Law Library of Congress. Peter specializes in Russia and the former Soviet Union. He has written a number of posts on topics related to countries in that region, including posts on Christmas, Soviet Style; Soviet investigation of Nazi war crimes, lustration in Ukraine, […]

FALQs: Danish and Swedish Response to the Current Refugee Crisis—Part II

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg. Elin is a foreign law research consultant who covers Scandinavian countries at the Law Library of Congress. Elin has previously written for In Custodia Legis on diverse topics including What’s in an Icelandic (Legal) Name?, Glad Syttonde Mai! Celebration of the Bicentenary of the Norwegian Constitution, Happy National Sami […]

FALQs: The European Union’s Approach to the Current Refugee Crisis

The following is a guest post by Theresa Papademetriou, a senior foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress who covers the European Union, Greece, Cyprus and Council of Europe. Theresa has previously blogged on “European Union Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights,” “European Union: Where is the Beef?,” “New Greek Regulation Designed to Fight Tax Evasion Problem: Will […]

Law Library Summer Interns 2015 – Pic of the Week

The Law Library benefits every year from the energy and enthusiasm of our summer interns!  We had another large group of interns this year, and many of them recently convened for the traditional group photo. This year, international interns hailed from Afghanistan, Canada, China, and Ireland.  We welcomed students from University of Washington, North Carolina […]

Global Legal Monitor: August Highlights

The Global Legal Monitor (GLM) is a good source for following legal developments around the world.  An excellent example of this is the range of topics covered by the GLM articles published in August, which included: Administrative law and regulatory procedures; Family planning and birth control; Human rights; Crime and law enforcement; Immigration; Taxation; and Freedom […]