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Australia’s 1967 Constitutional Referendum Related to Indigenous People: The Women Who Campaigned for “Yes”

I decided to observe International Women’s Day (today, March 8) by highlighting several Australian women, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, who had key roles in bringing about a constitutional referendum held in Australia on May 27, 1967, and in campaigning for the “yes” vote. The referendum contained questions related to two provisions in the Australian Constitution that discriminated against […]

Australia’s National Day

Today, January 26, is Australia Day, a national public holiday in Australia that commemorates the arrival of the “First Fleet” of convict ships that resulted in the establishment of the first British penal colony on the continent. It is considered Australia’s national day. On January 26, 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip raised the British flag at Sydney Cove, a […]

Australian and New Zealand Parliamentary Website Makeovers

Over the last couple of years you have read about the change from the THOMAS legislative information website to Congress.gov, and the many enhancements that have occurred along the way. While not as significant as this migration to a completely new website, both the Australian and New Zealand parliamentary websites have undergone makeovers this year. […]

On This Day: Establishment of the “White Australia” Policy

Over the last few years, the Law Library of Congress has published a number of reports related to the immigration and citizenship laws of various countries. For example, I’ve written reports about Australia’s points-based immigration system, guest worker programs, investor visas, and pathways to citizenship. However, these projects did not involve delving into the early […]

It’s Official! Online Versions of New Zealand and Australian Legislation are Authoritative

It’s been a couple of years since I wrote about the two websites that I use most frequently in my research: the Australian federal legislation website, ComLaw, and the New Zealand Legislation website.  Earlier this month I saw announcements about an exciting development regarding the New Zealand site, so I thought I’d provide an update […]

The Australian Parliament’s New Website

Last Friday, the Parliament of Australia launched its new website, replacing the one that had been in place for 12 years.  I had often used the old website to find a range of information on bills and parliamentary inquiries (i.e., investigations into particular issues).  This includes explanatory memoranda (according to the glossary on the new […]

New and Improved Access to Australian Legislation

Last year Clare wrote about changes to the UK government’s legislation website, and we’ve written a lot about enhancements to THOMAS, so when I got an email last week about the Australian government’s legislation website being upgraded I thought it definitely warranted some attention. The ComLaw website provides open access to Commonwealth (i.e., federal) legislation.  […]

Children’s Rights in the Law Library and Children’s Day, June 1

To secure the basic needs of children, the UN General Assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) on November 20, 1989, the 30th anniversary of its Declaration of the Rights of the Child. The Convention went into force on September 2, 1990 when enough nations ratified it. Currently, 196 nations have ratified the […]