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It’s Official! Online Versions of New Zealand and Australian Legislation are Authoritative

It’s been a couple of years since I wrote about the two websites that I use most frequently in my research: the Australian federal legislation website, ComLaw, and the New Zealand Legislation website.  Earlier this month I saw announcements about an exciting development regarding the New Zealand site, so I thought I’d provide an update […]

The Australian Parliament’s New Website

Last Friday, the Parliament of Australia launched its new website, replacing the one that had been in place for 12 years.  I had often used the old website to find a range of information on bills and parliamentary inquiries (i.e., investigations into particular issues).  This includes explanatory memoranda (according to the glossary on the new […]

New and Improved Access to Australian Legislation

Last year Clare wrote about changes to the UK government’s legislation website, and we’ve written a lot about enhancements to THOMAS, so when I got an email last week about the Australian government’s legislation website being upgraded I thought it definitely warranted some attention. The ComLaw website provides open access to Commonwealth (i.e., federal) legislation.  […]

An Introduction to Animal Law

This is a guest post by Ashley Sundin who was an intern with the Law Library’s Public Services Division this summer. Animal law is a rapidly growing area of law, especially in the past decade.  The human–animal interaction comes in a variety of forms including companionship, agriculture, and science.  As a result, animal law extends […]

Movies and Court Martials

Home with a cold this spring, I was re-reading a mystery novel which centered in part around the fate of a British officer in World War I.  In the novel, the officer had been executed for cowardice which made me begin to think about movies which portray incidents of military justice.  Although fellow staff members […]

Fingerprint Evidence Leads to Murder Conviction and Execution (in 1920 New Zealand)

These days when we think about forensic evidence our minds turn to shows such as the “CSI” franchise.  We think of DNA.  Bullet striations.  Hair and fiber analysis.  And fingerprints.  Of all these things, fingerprint matching has perhaps the longest history and remains one of the most used tools for identifying criminals.  I was therefore […]

Magna Carta in the US, Part I: The British Pavilion of the 1939 New York World’s Fair

From November 6 through January 19, 2015, the Lincoln Cathedral Magna Carta, one of four remaining originals from 1215 will be on display along with other rare materials from the Library’s rich collections to tell the story of 800 years of its influence on the history of political liberty.  This is the first installment in a series […]

Foreign and International Legal Research Guides – Pic of the Week

  Happy Friday!  We’ve updated the links of our legal research guides for fourteen foreign jurisdictions.  These research guides provide a one-stop primer on the legal systems of foreign countries by providing links to reference sources, compilations, citations guides, periodicals (indexes and databases), dictionaries, web resources, free public web sites, subscription-based services, subject-specific web sites, and country overviews.  The […]

Rugby, Apartheid, and the Law

The recent passing of Nelson Mandela saw much sorrow expressed around the world, as well as a great deal of reflection and celebration of his life.  Many articles were written from a wide range of angles and perspectives.  And many people related their personal experiences of how the events and achievements of Mandela’s life had […]