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Supreme Court of China, 99 Years Ago

While looking through the Law Library of Congress’s collection of a set of valuable Chinese judicial gazettes from the Minguo (or Republican) Period (1912-1949), I came across a picture of the Supreme Court (da li yuan) of China that was taken in 1913, ninety-nine years ago. So what functions did these nine men in the […]

China’s One Child Policy

In my previous post, which I wrote as a guest blogger (before I had the privilege of joining the club – AKA the Law Library’s blog team), I spoke about the awesome Law Library of Congress tradition known as Power Lunch.  I recently attended a Power Lunch talk on China’s family planning policy (commonly known as […]

Trains and Corruption in China

The corruption of government officials in China, as in a number of other countries, is a major concern and attempts to investigate and prosecute instances of corruption can generate a lot of public attention – particularly if a senior official or significant project is the subject of the investigation.  This has been the case with […]

The Basic Law of Hong Kong

Today is the eighteenth anniversary of the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). It is a statutory holiday in Hong Kong, as provided in the General Holidays Ordinance, in commemoration of Hong Kong’s return from the United Kingdom to the People’s Republic of China on July 1, 1997. On that same day, […]

An Interview with Shi Qiu, Foreign Law Intern

This week’s interview is with Shi Qiu, one of several interns working in the foreign, comparative, and international law divisions of the Law Library this summer. Describe your background I’m from China, and currently a third year JD candidate at Tulane University Law School, New Orleans, Louisiana. Prior to coming to the United States, I […]