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Supreme Court of China, 99 Years Ago

While looking through the Law Library of Congress’s collection of a set of valuable Chinese judicial gazettes from the Minguo (or Republican) Period (1912-1949), I came across a picture of the Supreme Court (da li yuan) of China that was taken in 1913, ninety-nine years ago. So what functions did these nine men in the […]

China’s One Child Policy

In my previous post, which I wrote as a guest blogger (before I had the privilege of joining the club – AKA the Law Library’s blog team), I spoke about the awesome Law Library of Congress tradition known as Power Lunch.  I recently attended a Power Lunch talk on China’s family planning policy (commonly known as […]

Trains and Corruption in China

The corruption of government officials in China, as in a number of other countries, is a major concern and attempts to investigate and prosecute instances of corruption can generate a lot of public attention – particularly if a senior official or significant project is the subject of the investigation.  This has been the case with […]

A Wealth of Law Library Reports in 2014!

The foreign law specialists and legal analysts at the Law Library of Congress have had another busy year writing reports and other responses to requests from a wide range of patrons.  Some of these were detailed multinational studies, such as our reports on police weapons in select countries and on the regulation of genetically modified […]

Global Legal Monitor: 2014 Year in Review

The Global Legal Monitor (GLM) had a great 2014.  One of the Law Library of Congress premier online sources, the GLM published 431 articles in 2014 covering legal developments around the world, particularly parliamentary acts and court decisions on a variety of issues. When writing for the Global Legal Monitor, we try to focus on issues that we believe will interest […]