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Supreme Court of China, 99 Years Ago

While looking through the Law Library of Congress’s collection of a set of valuable Chinese judicial gazettes from the Minguo (or Republican) Period (1912-1949), I came across a picture of the Supreme Court (da li yuan) of China that was taken in 1913, ninety-nine years ago. So what functions did these nine men in the […]

China’s One Child Policy

In my previous post, which I wrote as a guest blogger (before I had the privilege of joining the club – AKA the Law Library’s blog team), I spoke about the awesome Law Library of Congress tradition known as Power Lunch.  I recently attended a Power Lunch talk on China’s family planning policy (commonly known as […]

Trains and Corruption in China

The corruption of government officials in China, as in a number of other countries, is a major concern and attempts to investigate and prosecute instances of corruption can generate a lot of public attention – particularly if a senior official or significant project is the subject of the investigation.  This has been the case with […]

Global Legal Monitor: August Highlights

The Global Legal Monitor (GLM) is a good source for following legal developments around the world.  An excellent example of this is the range of topics covered by the GLM articles published in August, which included: Administrative law and regulatory procedures; Family planning and birth control; Human rights; Crime and law enforcement; Immigration; Taxation; and Freedom […]