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Law, a Curse and Life in an Italian Ghetto

Although Alessandro Aldobrandini (1664-1734) was not the first in the long history of Italy’s Aldobrandini family to traverse the cursus honorum of the church’s hierarchy, his record of achievement was substantial: educated first in the Seminario Romano and later in the University of Pisa, where he attained the degree of doctor utriusque juris, he was […]

Referendum on New Zealand’s Voting System

Today (currently Saturday, November 26 in New Zealand) is election day in New Zealand.  In addition to voting for a candidate standing in their district (“electorate“) and for the political party that they want in Parliament, voters will be participating in a referendum on whether the electoral system should be changed. The current electoral system […]

Laws in a Crusader State

On November 27, 1095, Pope Urban II declared the First Crusade at the Council of Clermont. In so doing, he inaugurated a period of centuries of intense, though intermittent, warfare fought at the peripheries of Christendom. The Crusades exist in our historical memory as a period of near constant bloodshed and destruction, but out of the chaos […]

Lecture by Professor Allan Brewer-Carías: The Connection between the U.S. Independence and the Hispanic American Independence Movement

The following is a guest post by Dante Figueroa, Senior Legal Analyst at the Law Library of Congress. On November 22, 2011, from noon to 1:30 pm, the Law Library of Congress will host the renowned Venezuelan academic, intellectual, and constitutional scholar Allan Brewer-Carías, who will present a lecture titled: The Connection between the U.S. […]

Sumptuous Sumptuary Laws

When doing my cool job, I never know what will cross my path.  Recently, I happened to discover some items covering early sumptuary laws in England.  These laws were prohibitions against what the Monarch at the time considered to be “extravagance,” typically in the form of food or clothing.  They were reportedly aimed to preserve the class system […]

Talking About THOMAS at the National Book Festival – Pic of the Week

We had a great time at the National Book Festival this past weekend talking with visitors about how the Law Library can help people connect with Congress, including through THOMAS. We handed out lots of gavel pencils as souvenirs! Andrew gave a presentation in the Library of Congress tent on Saturday about “THOMAS Takeaways for […]

The Law Librarian of Congress, Rabbi Kook, Digitization and Israeli Education

On September 6, 2011, staff and management of the Law Library of Congress listened with much interest to Law Librarian of Congress Roberta Shaffer as she shared with us her vision for a World Law Library for the 21st Century.  She reiterated the Law Library’s commitment to acquire, preserve, and provide access to a universal […]

The Articles of Confederation: The First Constitution of the United States

The following is a guest post by James Martin, a Collections and Outreach Specialist, in observation of Constitution Day on September 17, 2011. The need for a united policy during the War of Independence led the thirteen states to draft and approve an organic document for a national government.  In 1776, the Continental Congress created […]