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John Selden As An Early Modern Maccabee

We are in the midst of the Jewish festival of Hanukkah. Often known as “the Festival of Lights” in reference to the basic feature of its observance – the lighting of the eight-branched candelabra – Hanukkah commemorates the events surrounding the rededication of the Temple of Jerusalem after a period of political oppression and forced […]

From the Law Librarian of Congress

The following is a guest post by Roberta I. Shaffer, Law Librarian of Congress. Roberta has posted to the blog on multiple occasions including: Happy Old Year, The Law Library of Congress Strategic Plan Released, and My Trip to the Future. Another year has passed and I am pleased once again to send you great cheer and […]

Caramuel’s Metametrica and the Probability of Law

Richly tessellated fields, icons of altars and Doric columns, glyphs of all-seeing eyes, sun-gods and the man in the moon – Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz’s engravings were meant to be at once mysterious and explanatory, a window for the initiated into a world of speculative arcana. Twenty-five of Caramuel’s engravings displaying an array of anagrams, […]

Law, a Curse and Life in an Italian Ghetto

Although Alessandro Aldobrandini (1664-1734) was not the first in the long history of Italy’s Aldobrandini family to traverse the cursus honorum of the church’s hierarchy, his record of achievement was substantial: educated first in the Seminario Romano and later in the University of Pisa, where he attained the degree of doctor utriusque juris, he was […]

Referendum on New Zealand’s Voting System

Today (currently Saturday, November 26 in New Zealand) is election day in New Zealand.  In addition to voting for a candidate standing in their district (“electorate“) and for the political party that they want in Parliament, voters will be participating in a referendum on whether the electoral system should be changed. The current electoral system […]