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The Consilia of Alessandro Nievo: On Jews and Usury in 15th Century Italy

In anticipation of the Library’s upcoming program, “La Città degli Ebrei/The City of the Jews: Segregated Space and the Admission of Strangers in the Jewish Ghetto of Venice,” – a conference held in collaboration with the Embassy of Italy and the Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Maryland to […]

Jewish American Heritage Month Display

Each year Congress designates May as Jewish American Heritage Month, “honoring the contributions of Jewish Americans to the United States of America.” The Law Library’s website has a page dedicated to the history of this observance. So this year, the Collection Services Division has put together a display of items from our collection that showcases […]

Courtroom Sketches

Though courtroom drawings in the United States reportedly go back to the Salem Witch Trials, the idea of sketch artists in the courtroom has fluctuated in popularity within the judicial branch, at times tolerated, at other times banned, from the proceedings. Courtroom artists are in no way affiliated with the legal system. They are usually […]

The Rehabilitation of Dante Alighieri, Seven Centuries Later

The following is a guest post by Dante Figueroa, a senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress. Dante has contributed a number of In Custodia Legis blog posts, including on Resources and Treasures of the Italian Parliamentary Libraries,  Legislation Protecting Italian Cultural Heritage, and Proposed Anti-Sect Legislation in Italy: An Ongoing Debate. On December […]

World Health Day

This is a guest post by Constance Johnson, a senior legal research analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  Constance has previously written on Water Rights on Star Island, Law Relating to Refugee Rights – Global Legal Collection Highlights, and most recently on her summer vacation on Star Island. April 7, 2016, is World Health […]

Becoming the Plutarch of Renaissance Lawyers

Quid sit quod multi vitas principum and ducum… diligentissime conscripserint atque inde genus hoc scribendi profectum, paulatim ad eos homines pervenerit, qui leniores quodammodo virtutes profitentur, Philosophos dico, Medicos, Oratores, Poetas… donec ad Rhetores ac Grammaticos deventum est, nemo adhuc extiterit, qui sibi Legumlatorum et Iurisprudentum vitas in argumentum iusti et peculiaris operis desumpserit… How […]

Manuscript Waste Bindings at the Library of Congress – Pic of the Week

In this week’s pic of the week post, we catch up with Library of Congress employee Dan Paterson, who is a senior rare book conservator in the Conservation Section of the Library’s Conservation Division. Since 2013, Dan has been surveying book bindings in the Library’s special collections, looking for bindings that incorporate manuscript waste. Manuscript […]

A Founding Father is Born on March 16, 1751

Today the Library of Congress is commemorating the 265th anniversary of James Madison’s birth. Madison, the fourth president of the United States, was born on March 16, 1751 in the Colony of Virginia. The Library’s James Madison Memorial Building serves as the national memorial to James Madison. The building was approved by an act of […]

On the Shelf: Minnesota Session Laws

This installment of On the Shelf features the Session Laws of the State of Minnesota. The title caught my attention when technicians inventorying and reviewing it brought up several questions (leading to one incorrect answer on my part). The initial question was in reference to the first three volumes which had a different title than […]