{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

A Duel with Rifles

Several years ago, I came across a reference in the Congressional Globe to some sort of crime which seemed to have been committed by a member of Congress.  I was intrigued and being an avid mystery reader, wanted to discover who had done what to whom! The entry which originally caught my eye appeared on […]

Library of Congress Announces First Legislative Data Challenge

Andrew and I have both mentioned the Akoma Ntoso schema for representing law and legislation in XML and enabling easier exchange of this information on In Custodia Legis in the past. Today we have more exciting news for you. To help advance the development of international exchange standards for legislative data, the Library of Congress is […]

Connect with the Law Library of Congress at the American Association of Law Libraries Conference

It is that time of year again.  From July 13-16, law librarians from across the country gather to discuss best practices, enhance skills, and connect with new people and resources.  It is also a good time to connect with those of us who work at the Law Library of Congress and will be attending the […]

The State of Congress.gov at the 2013 Legislative Data Conference

The following is a guest post by Tammie Nelson, project manager of Congress.gov and an Information Technology Specialist at the Library of Congress. I spoke earlier today at the Committee on House Administration’s Legislative Data and Transparency Conference on recent progress and coming updates to Congress.gov.  For those who were not able to attend the conference or to see it […]

In God We Trust

When I began my research on the history of this national motto which prominently appears on U.S. currency, I glanced at the Wikipedia article on “In God we trust.”  The entry contends that the motto was inspired by the fourth verse of the Star Spangled Banner: “Then conquer we must, when our cause is just, And […]

History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives: A One-Stop-Shop for House Heritage

The following is a guest post by Laura Turner O’Hara, Historical Publications Specialist in the Office of the Historian, U.S. House of Representatives. What powers does the Constitution grant the House of Representatives? How many women Members of Congress are from Nebraska? What was the mood on Capitol Hill during the Bonus March? Why are […]

Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month.  This year, March has also seen the Centennial of the 1913 Suffrage March, and International Women’s Day.  Women’s History Month was established in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 to establish Women’s History Week.  Both this law and the subsequent Presidential Proclamation 4903 speak to the important role women played […]