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New Report Looks at Campaign Finance Laws in Seven Countries

There is frequent discussion and debate about U.S. campaign finance laws and the increasing amounts spent by candidates running for the U.S. Congress. Certain aspects of campaign finance regulation have been the subject of judicial review by the Supreme Court. How do other countries approach the complex task of regulating campaign contributions and spending? This is the subject of a recently published Law Library of Congress report, titled Regulation of Campaign Finance and Free Advertising.

Senate Elections Comm., 5/26/20 (Senate Committee on Elections which is investigating campaign expenses of the various candidates for the presidential nomination in both parties.Left to right Senators Pomerene, Reed, Edge, Kenyon, Chairman, and Spencer), Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

Senate Elections Comm., 5/26/20 (Senate Committee on Elections which is investigating campaign expenses of the various candidates for the presidential nomination in both parties. Left to right Senators Pomerene, Reed, Edge, Kenyon, Chairman, and Spencer). Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The report was prepared by staff of the Global Legal Research Directorate and is composed of country surveys on Austria, Canada, Finland, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. Each individual country survey examines whether a country allows campaign contributions and the level of contribution limits for political parties and candidates; the existence of caps on campaign expenditures; and the availability of free airtime for broadcast advertising. The report includes a comparative summary and a table comparing specific requirements under the laws of the surveyed countries.

We invite you to review this report along with the many other multinational and single country reports, including several on elections and campaign finance, available on the Law Library’s website.

FALQs: Brexit Referendum

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, foreign law specialist for the United Kingdom and a number of Commonwealth jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. The United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (EEC – now the European Union) in 1973. It had sought entry twice in the 1960s only to be blocked […]

June 26: A Day to Support Victims of Torture

The following is a guest post by Connie Johnson, a senior legal research analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  Connie has posted several times before, including items on Water Rights on Star Island, Law Relating to Refugee Rights – Global Legal Collection Highlights, her summer vacation on Star Island, and World Health Day. June 26 is […]

Iceland – Global Legal Collection Highlights

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg. Elin is a foreign law research consultant who covers Scandinavian countries at the Law Library of Congress. Elin has previously written for In Custodia Legis on diverse topics including What’s in an Icelandic (Legal) Name?, Glad Syttonde Mai! Celebration of the Bicentenary of the Norwegian Constitution, Happy National Sami […]

How Do You Say “Law” in…?

I work in an amazing place. We sometimes refer to it as a mini United Nations because we have staff from around the globe.  Our Global Legal Research Directorate provides a wealth of foreign, international, and comparative reports for Congress.  You can access our foreign law reference collection in the Global Legal Resource Room. There is also […]

Law and Mrs. de Winter

I recently read Daphne DuMaurier’s novel Rebecca.  I had started reading the novel several times before, while visiting my grandmother, but I always had to leave before getting much beyond the first two or three chapters.  It is a suspenseful book–and even knowing the basics of the story did not detract from the tension.  What did surprise […]

FALQs: Impeachment Process in Brazil

The following is a guest post by Eduardo Soares, a foreign law specialist covering Brazil and other Portuguese-speaking countries at the Law Library of Congress. Eduardo has previously published posts about the Brazilian law collection, capoeira and the law, a Law Library report on citizenship pathways and border protection, highlights of the Law Library’s collection […]