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How Do You Say “Book” in…?

The author of "I am Blop!," Hervé Tullet, reading at the Library of Congress. Photo by Andrew Weber

The author of “I am Blop!,” Hervé Tullet, reading at the Library of Congress. Photo by Andrew Weber

It’s almost time for the National Book Festival (#NatBookFest)! I have looked through the line-up, which you can browse by author or schedule, and am excited to try to see the authors of “Rosie Revere, Engineer,” “The Princess in Black,” and “I am Blop!” while there. (Can you guess the ages of the people I will be attending with?)

I am not the only one excited about the festival. Liah wrote about some of our staff who will be working at the festival. I hope to catch Barbara‘s presentation on Law.gov and Congress.gov from 1:40 p.m. to 2:10 p.m.

I have also had a chance to speak with a variety of others who are looking forward to the festival. To celebrate I have asked a dozen co-workers How Do You Say “Book” in…? and recorded them saying “book” in a dozen different languages.

  • Bok in Swedish by Elin
  • Book in ASL (American Sign Language) by Ellie
  • 书/書 (shu) in Simplified Chinese/Traditional Chinese by Laney
  • Buch in German by Jenny
  • Pukapuka in Māori by Kelly
  • книга (kniga) in Russian by Peter
  • كتاب (ketāb) in Arabic by George
  • Libro in Spanish by Norma
  • መጽሓፍ (metshaf) in Tigrinya by Hanibal
  • ספר (sefer) in Hebrew by Ruth
  • Kitaab in Urdu by Tariq
  • Livre in French by Nicolas

If you like the How Do You Say “Book” in…? video, be sure to watch How Do You Say “Law” in…? and How Do You Say “Library” in…?.  And if you know how to say “book” in another language, please share in the comments below.

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