{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

Sedition Law in India

The following is a guest post by Tariq Ahmad, a Legal Analyst in the Global Legal Research Center of the Law Library of Congress.  British colonial era laws continue to have relevancy in the legal systems of India and Pakistan.  Ironically, a sedition law used by the British colonial government to suppress nationalist dissent in the […]

Supreme Court of China, 99 Years Ago

While looking through the Law Library of Congress’s collection of a set of valuable Chinese judicial gazettes from the Minguo (or Republican) Period (1912-1949), I came across a picture of the Supreme Court (da li yuan) of China that was taken in 1913, ninety-nine years ago. So what functions did these nine men in the […]

Global Legal Monitor: August Highlights

Our top most viewed Global Legal Monitor articles in August covered seven different legal areas: Communications and Electronic Information; Constitutional Law; Criminal Law and Procedure; Foreign Investment; Immigration; Labor; and Nationality and Citizenship.  Here is a list of these articles in the order of their popularity: Japan: Stricter Sentences for Sex Offenders   South Korea: Permanent […]

Law Library of Congress at the National Book Festival

This has been a busy week for the Law Library of Congress.  We have unveiled Congress.gov (our new legislative website), celebrated Constitution Day, and to round the week out, we are preparing for the National Book Festival.  This will be the Law Library’s second year at the National Book Festival.  Our staff will be manning […]

Legal Pirates, Treasure, and Murder: A Tale from the South Seas

Last week, as I scanned news items from across the Pacific, a particular story caught my eye.  A sunken pirate ship laden with treasure.  Massacre of the crew by island warriors.  A British boy that lived to tell the tale of his adventures in the islands.  It sounded like something Robert Louis Stevenson or Daniel […]

The Impact of Russian Laws on US-Russia Economic Relations

The following is a guest post by Peter Roudik, Director of Legal Research at the Law Library of Congress.  In addition to his administrative duties, Peter provides jurisdictional coverage for Russia and other former Soviet republics and explains legal developments in these countries to the Law Library’s patrons.  Russia is currently the subject of discussion […]

From Recipient to Donor: The Changing Face of Aid

Over a year ago I visited a remarkable country.  Rich in history, art, culture and beautiful landscapes, this country has traditionally received foreign aid due to its general low income level but is now providing aid to other countries.  I was amazed to see its recent monumental progress in science and technology although it is true […]