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Research on Bioethics-Related Laws of Various Countries

Cloning, genetic modification, stem cell research, IVF.  I’m sure that you have seen or heard these terms before in the media, which frequently reports on new treatments for various diseases and conditions, women having babies through surrogates (or multiple babies as a result of fertility treatments), and changes to how our food is produced.  You […]

Law and Longitude: A Trip to Greenwich

The following is a guest post by Constance A. Johnson, a Legal Research Analyst at the Law Library’s Global Legal Research Center.  Connie has previously blogged about Water Rights at Star Island, Human Rights Day, and our Guide on Legal Translation.  On a recent short vacation to London with my husband, I was lucky on the weather and was able to […]

Global Legal Monitor: September Highlights

The Global Legal Monitor (GLM) is a Law Library of Congress publication providing summaries on new legal developments around the world.  It is updated frequently and can be searched by author, topic and jurisdiction. Here is a list of the top ten most viewed GLM articles in September, including ones published about two years ago that remain popular […]

The New Cyber Battlefield: Implications under International Law of Armed Conflict

The application of international law of armed conflict to cyber-warfare has been under intense discussion recently following the release of Stuxnet, a highly sophisticated computer worm and related malware which was reportedly developed by two technologically advanced countries. The Stuxnet release allegedly ruined centrifuges at Iran’s Natanz uranium enrichment facility. According to Reuters, Iran’s Revolutionary Guards had announced that that country was prepared […]

Capoeira: From Crime to Culture

The following is a guest post by Eduardo Soares, a Senior Foreign Law Specialist in the Global Legal Research Center of the Law Library of Congress.  Eduardo is a Brazilian attorney and provides research services relating to the laws of Portuguese-speaking jurisdictions. Portuguese explorers first made landfall in Brazil on April 22, 1500.  After the discovery, the […]

Sedition in England: The Abolition of a Law From a Bygone Era

Abolishing ancient laws in England is often no easy task.  A significant degree of research is involved before these laws are amended or abolished.  The research has to be particularly thorough to avoid one of the oldest – that of unintended consequences. The issue of thoroughly researching laws was demonstrated several years ago when the government was […]

Sedition Law in India

The following is a guest post by Tariq Ahmad, a Legal Analyst in the Global Legal Research Center of the Law Library of Congress.  British colonial era laws continue to have relevancy in the legal systems of India and Pakistan.  Ironically, a sedition law used by the British colonial government to suppress nationalist dissent in the […]