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FALQs: New Zealand’s Flag Referendums

Between March 3 and March 24, 2016, New Zealanders were able to vote in the country’s second referendum related to whether or not to change the official flag.  Previously, in November-December 2015, voting in the first referendum narrowed the list of possible alternative flag designs from five to one; the second referendum was a run-off […]

Becoming the Plutarch of Renaissance Lawyers

Quid sit quod multi vitas principum and ducum… diligentissime conscripserint atque inde genus hoc scribendi profectum, paulatim ad eos homines pervenerit, qui leniores quodammodo virtutes profitentur, Philosophos dico, Medicos, Oratores, Poetas… donec ad Rhetores ac Grammaticos deventum est, nemo adhuc extiterit, qui sibi Legumlatorum et Iurisprudentum vitas in argumentum iusti et peculiaris operis desumpserit… How […]

New Resource Covers the Laws of 157 Countries on the Extradition of Citizens

The Law Library of Congress has recently published a chart containing information on the terms that apply to the extradition of citizens in 157 jurisdictions around the globe. Of the countries surveyed, 60 were found to have laws that prevent the extradition of their own citizens, while the laws of 31 other countries generally allow such requests. […]

Legal Challenges for Uber in the European Union and in Germany

The following is a guest post by Jenny Gesley, a foreign law specialist covering Germany and other German-speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress.  Jenny has contributed several posts to this blog, including posts on the Regulation of Electronic Cigarettes in Germany, constitutional challenges related to the privatization of air traffic control in Germany, and […]

When is a Book Not a Book?

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and several other Asian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Sayuri has previously written blog posts about testing of older drivers in Japan, sentencing of parents who kill children, English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws […]

Parliaments Around the World

The first multinational report to be published on the Law Library’s website in 2016 allows us to consider some fundamental questions underlying the practice of comparative law: who makes the laws, and how are the laws made? The report covers eleven jurisdictions with different legal and constitutional traditions and systems of government. We have the […]