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Attorney Advertising in Germany

On July 14, 1987, the German Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, BVerfG) rendered two decisions that paved the way to allowing attorney advertising in Germany. Nicknamed the “Bastille decisions” because of the date and their ”revolutionary character,” the decisions allowed attorneys for the first time to advertise their services to the public on a regular basis although several […]

The Declaration of Independence in Foreign Languages

In preparation for the upcoming Independence Day celebration tomorrow, we thought it might be interesting to show that there is also an international dimension to this national holiday. The Declaration of Independence is regarded as one of the milestone documents that shaped America, but it also had a major influence abroad. After the Continental Congress approved the […]

A Guide to Researching EU Law

The following is a guest post by Micaela DelMonte, a lawyer from the European Parliamentary Research Service who volunteered at the Law Library of Congress during May 2017. News about Brexit and the so-called Article 50 procedure have dominated the news about the European Union (EU) lately. If you are interested in researching these or […]

International Tribunals Web Archive Launched

International tribunals have been around for some time, but the creation of international courts and tribunals to deal with international crimes is a relatively recent occurrence, with the first international criminal tribunal established just after World War II. The Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law defines “international courts and tribunals” as ”permanent judicial bodies made up of independent […]

Proxy Voting in France

The following is a guest post from Nicolas Boring, foreign law specialist covering French speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. France has just finished its election season!  French citizens elected Emmanuel Macron as their new president earlier in May, and they returned to the voting booths on June 11 and June 18 for parliamentary […]

Danish Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law research consultant covering Scandinavian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. This post is part of a series highlighting the Law Library’s foreign law collections. A couple weeks ago, Jenny wrote about Germany’s “Day of the Basic Law,” which is celebrated on the anniversary […]

Releasing Agunot from the Chains of Marriage in Selected Countries

Last week I blogged about Israeli legislative and judicial efforts to assist Jewish women who cannot divorce their husbands (עגונות, agunot,  literally “chained”; עגונה, agunah in singular). In accordance with Jewish law, which applies to matters of marriage and divorce of Jewish residents and citizens of Israel, a valid divorce requires the consensual delivery by the husband and receipt […]

Anniversary of the German Basic Law

Every year on May 23, Germany celebrates the “Day of the Basic Law.” The Basic Law, Germany’s constitution, lays down fundamental rights, establishes the structure and administration of the Federal Republic of Germany, and sets out the legal framework of the three branches of government. Furthermore, it establishes the Federal Republic of Germany as a democratic, federal, […]

Mythology, Culture, and Law in the South Pacific

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage month here in the United States. During this month, we are encouraged “to learn more about our Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander heritage.” In thinking about how to further this goal for readers of In Custodia Legis I was initially inspired by the release last year of the first animated […]