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1066 and the Bayeux Tapestry

Last Friday, October 14th, marked the 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings.  On October 14, 1066, William the Conqueror invaded England and overthrew the last Anglo Saxon king, Harold Godwinson. The Bayeux Tapestry commemorates the events of that turbulent time.  My colleague Emily has a fold-out book of the tapestry, and I thought it […]

New Law Library Reports Cover Access to Encrypted Communications and Intelligence Gathering

More and more internet traffic is encrypted. Encryption is a method of protecting electronic information by converting it into an unintelligible form (encoding) so that it can only be decoded with a key. Google stated in its latest transparency report that 85% of requests from around the world to Google’s servers used encrypted connections in […]

An Interview with Molly O’Casey, Foreign Law Intern

Today’s interview is with Molly O’Casey, a foreign law intern working with Nicolas Boring on research related to the laws of France and other French-speaking jurisdictions and with Clare Feikert-Ahalt on research related to the United Kingdom and a number of Commonwealth jurisdictions. Molly has recently graduated from a dual law degree (civil law/common law) […]

Nuremberg Trial Verdicts

Seventy years ago – on October 1, 1946 – the Nuremberg trial, one of the most prominent trials of the last century, concluded when the International Military Tribunal (IMT) issued the verdicts for the main war criminals of the Second World War. The IMT sentenced twelve of the defendants to death, seven to terms of […]

Australian and New Zealand Parliamentary Website Makeovers

Over the last couple of years you have read about the change from the THOMAS legislative information website to Congress.gov, and the many enhancements that have occurred along the way. While not as significant as this migration to a completely new website, both the Australian and New Zealand parliamentary websites have undergone makeovers this year. […]

Welsh Legal History

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, foreign law specialist for the United Kingdom and a number of Commonwealth jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress.  Clare has previously written many interesting posts, most recently: FALQs: Brexit Referendum and The Case of a Ghost Haunted England for Over Two Hundred Years. Frequently, the four […]

New Chinese Rule Legalizing Uber

As described in previous blog posts authored by Jenny and Tariq, the rapid expansion of Uber around the world has presented new challenges to regulators in foreign countries. It is interesting to note that China recently issued a departmental rule regulating “online taxi-booking services.” Effective November 1, 2016, the Interim Administrative Measures for the Business of Online […]