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When is a Book Not a Book?

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and several other Asian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Sayuri has previously written blog posts about testing of older drivers in Japan, sentencing of parents who kill children, English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws […]

Parliaments Around the World

The first multinational report to be published on the Law Library’s website in 2016 allows us to consider some fundamental questions underlying the practice of comparative law: who makes the laws, and how are the laws made? The report covers eleven jurisdictions with different legal and constitutional traditions and systems of government. We have the […]

On the Shelf – Der Wiener Richter

It seems as though Collection Services Division’s staff have been composing On the Shelf posts for ages. Since we’ve started posting, I’ve been reminded by colleagues about items found years ago that we would pass around or send photos of or talk about over lunch. One such item is a book Brian Kuhagen found a […]

Christmas, Soviet Style

The following is a guest post by Peter Roudik, director of legal research at the Law Library of Congress. Peter has written a number of interesting posts related to Russia and the former Soviet Union for In Custodia Legis, including posts on the Soviet investigation of Nazi war crimes, lustration in Ukraine, Crimean history and […]

Most Viewed Legal Research Reports in 2015

With 2015 coming to end we are looking back at our accomplishments for the year. Recently, Donna wrote about the Top 15 Articles from the Enhanced GLM. Another online source that is useful for policy makers, legal researchers, and anyone interested in U.S., foreign, international, and comparative law is our collection of legal research reports.  These […]