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What I Did on My Summer Vacation

The following is a guest post by Constance Johnson, a senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress. Connie has previously written or co-written a number of posts for In Custodia Legis including: Law Relating to Refugee Rights-Global Legal Collection Highlights, Water Rights at Star Island and Laws on Homosexuality in African Nations.

Solar array on Star Island at sunset. Photo by Dennis O'Keefe.

Solar array on Star Island at sunset. Photo by Dennis O’Keefe.

This year, as in many previous years, I took my summer vacation on Star Island, a conference center on an island off the coast of New Hampshire. The theme for this year’s international affairs conference was climate change. I heard a number of excellent speakers on the topic, covering a range of aspects, including science, policy, and social justice issues. I learned a lot–including why the wood-burning stove craze of the 1970s is now controversial as issues have been raised about the energy efficiency of burning wood.

One development highlighted by Heidi Weiskel, a scientist who works for the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide (ELAW), is the establishment in India of the National Green Tribunal, a court handling environmental cases. The 2010 Act that established the court described its purpose as the “effective and expeditious disposal of cases relating to environment protection and conservation of forest and other natural resources including enforcement of any legal right related to environment and giving relief and compensation for damages to persons and property….”

Star Island itself is doing something to limit the use of fossil fuels and thus help with global warming. Its solar array, activated this year, is now producing a substantial amount of the power used on the island.

Cooking Up a Solution to Link Rot

The following is a guest post by the Law Library’s managing editor, Charlotte Stichter. When Charlotte is not at her day job she loves to cook, and is currently on a quest to find the perfect recipe for clafouti. For those with vivid imaginations, the terms “link rot” and “reference rot” might conjure images of […]

A Look inside the Office of General Counsel at the Federal Election Commission

The following is a guest post by Geneviève Claveau and Julia Heron, summer interns at the Global Legal Research Directorate, Law Library of Congress.  Geneviève and Julia have previously written a post on Quebec’s Dual Legal System. On July 15, we had the opportunity to visit the Federal Election Commission (FEC), located at 999 E Street […]

Litigating Memory: The Legal Case Behind the Moiwana and Sand Creek Massacres

The following is a guest post by Collection Services Division’s intern Timothy Byram.  Timothy’s interest in Latin American culture led him to one of the Library’s many public programs, piquing his interest in two particular cases which he discusses here. Litigation is defined as a contest in a courtroom realized “for the purpose of enforcing […]

Hong Kong Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights

The following is a guest post by Shi Qiu, a foreign law intern at the Law Library of Congress. July 1, 2015 marked the 18th anniversary of the establishment of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. On this anniversary we published a post about the Basic Law of Hong Kong. For non-legal information on Hong Kong, you can read an article […]

Regulation of Electronic Cigarettes in Germany

The following is a guest post by Jenny Gesley, a foreign law specialist covering Germany and other German-speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. She has previously written about the privatization of air traffic control in Germany and the Greek debt crisis. The emergence of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is a recent phenomenon. E-cigarettes are battery-operated […]

The Civil Law System – Global Legal Collection Highlights

The following is a guest post by Eduardo Soares, a foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress covering Portuguese-speaking jurisdictions.  Eduardo has previously published posts about the Brazilian law collection, capoeira and the law, and on a Law Library report on citizenship pathways and border protection. Foreign and comparative law research involves not […]

FALQs: The Greek Debt Crisis – Part 1

The following is a guest post by Jenny Gesley, a foreign law specialist covering Germany and other German-speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress.  Jenny has previously written a post on constitutional challenges related to the privatization of air traffic control in Germany. On July 8, 2015, the new Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos […]

What Constitutional Challenges Arise When Air Traffic Control is Privatized? A New Report Looks at the Situation in Germany

The following is a guest post by Jenny Gesley, a foreign law specialist covering Germany and other German-speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. As Congress debates the reauthorization of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, which will expire in September 2015, the question of whether to privatize air traffic control (ATC) […]