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Civil War Military Trials

This is a guest post by Pamela Barnes Craig, Instruction/Reference Librarian and co-author of Being Well-Informed:  Congress.gov Training.  As the Library of Congress opens the exhibit The Civil War in America with 200+ unique treasures, there remain many more valuable Civil War collections available for researching and viewing.  The Law Library of Congress has several of […]

The Electoral College – What Is It and How Does It Function?

The following is a guest post by Barbara Bavis and Robert Brammer, both legal reference librarians in the Public Services Division of the Law Library of Congress. The 2012 Presidential election is projected to be close, and attention has turned to whether the Electoral College may diverge from the popular vote in shaping the outcome […]

A Congress.gov Interview with Andy Mendelson, Head of the Legislative Analysis and Information Section

The following is a guest post by Kimberly Ferguson, Specialist in Legislative Information Systems Management in the Library of Congress.  Kimberly previous blogged about “Bills To Be Considered on the House Floor” Repository for In Custodia Legis. This week’s interview is with Andy Mendelson, a manager of legislative information at the Congressional Research Service (CRS). Andy’s contributions to Congress.gov […]

A Congress.gov Interview with Valerie Heitshusen, Analyst on Congress and the Legislative Process

The following is a guest post by Kimberly Ferguson, Specialist in Legislative Information Systems Management in the Library of Congress.  Kimberly previously blogged about “Bills To Be Considered on the House Floor” Repository for In Custodia Legis. This week’s interview is with Val Heitshusen, a legislative process expert and educator in the Congressional Research Service (CRS). Val’s contributions to […]

Law and Longitude: A Trip to Greenwich

The following is a guest post by Constance A. Johnson, a Legal Research Analyst at the Law Library’s Global Legal Research Center.  Connie has previously blogged about Water Rights at Star Island, Human Rights Day, and our Guide on Legal Translation.  On a recent short vacation to London with my husband, I was lucky on the weather and was able to […]

Being Well-informed: Congress.gov Training

This is a guest post by Judy Graves, Digital Projects Coordinator, Digital Reference Section and instructor, Introducing loc.gov, the monthly webinar series and Pamela Barnes Craig, Instruction/Reference Librarian. “Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government. . . .” Thomas Jefferson to Richard Price, Jan. 8, 1789 Believing wholeheartedly that […]

Capoeira: From Crime to Culture

The following is a guest post by Eduardo Soares, a Senior Foreign Law Specialist in the Global Legal Research Center of the Law Library of Congress.  Eduardo is a Brazilian attorney and provides research services relating to the laws of Portuguese-speaking jurisdictions. Portuguese explorers first made landfall in Brazil on April 22, 1500.  After the discovery, the […]

Sedition Law in India

The following is a guest post by Tariq Ahmad, a Legal Analyst in the Global Legal Research Center of the Law Library of Congress.  British colonial era laws continue to have relevancy in the legal systems of India and Pakistan.  Ironically, a sedition law used by the British colonial government to suppress nationalist dissent in the […]

Furious Tweeting – Pic of the Week

The following is a guest post by Donna Sokol, Special Assistant to the Law Librarian of Congress.  Her most recent posts included a 6-installment series regarding the legal themes in the art and architecture of the Library of Congress’s Jefferson Building. Three of our law librarians were furiously live-tweeting at Wednesday’s Congress.gov launch.  Thirty fingers […]