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A Visit to the National Library of Azerbaijan in Baku – Pic of the Week

This is a guest post by Pamela Barnes Craig, Instruction/Reference Librarian and a frequent contributor to In Custodia Legis.  She is the co-author of the blog post Being Well-Informed: Congress.gov Training and her recent posts include Happy Belated Birthday, Title IX, and Civil War Military Trials. I was fortunate to visit the National Library of Azerbaijan in Baku […]

Frequent Reference Question: How Many Federal Laws Are There?

The following is a guest post by Shameema Rahman, Senior Legal Research Specialist in our Public Services Division.  Shameema is a frequent contributor to In Custodia Legis; her most recent post was entitled Presidential Signing Statements. At the reference desk, we are frequently asked to estimate the number of federal laws in force. However, trying to tally this […]

New Greek Regulation Designed to Fight Tax Evasion Problem: Will it Work?

The following is a guest post by my colleague, Theresa Papademetriou, who is the Law Library of Congress Senior Foreign Law Specialist for the European Union, Greece, and Cyprus. Theresa’s blog post highlights Greece’s efforts to address the country’s economic challenges by, among other actions, tackling a common problem of “unreporting” or under-reporting of taxable revenues by providers of goods and services.  Last month, […]

A Fresh Update on the Canonical Rules on the Election of a New Pontiff

The following is a guest post by Dante Figueroa, Senior Legal Information Analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  Dante has previously written blog posts on canon law and the papacy:  Canon Law Update; Citizenship in the Vatican City State; Medieval Canon Law; and The Papal Inquisition in Modena.    The posting Canonical Rules on the […]

Canonical Rules on the Resignation of a Pontiff, and the Election of a New Pontiff (part II of II)

The following is a guest post by Dante Figueroa, Senior Legal Information Analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  Dante has previously written blog posts on canon law and the papacy:  Canon Law Update; Citizenship in the Vatican City State; Medieval Canon Law; and The Papal Inquisition in Modena.    In my last post, I discussed the […]

Canonical Rules on the Resignation of a Pontiff, and the Election of a New Pontiff (part I of II)

The following is a guest post by Dante Figueroa, Senior Legal Information Analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  Dante has previously written blog posts on canon law and the papacy:  Canon Law Update; Citizenship in the Vatican City State; Medieval Canon Law; and The Papal Inquisition in Modena. In a Concistoro ordinario pubblico (from […]

Happy Lunar New Year!

The following is a guest post by Laney Zhang, our Chinese law specialist at the Law Library of Congress.  Laney has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis about pandas, trains and corruption, and Chinese supreme court clothing.  Earlier this week she wrote Crouching Tiger, Hidden Author. My favorite traditional Chinese holiday is coming next week! Yes, […]

The Case of the Missing Author

The following is a guest post is by Melanie Polutta, Librarian Cataloger in the Iberia/Rio Section of the African, Latin American, and Western European Division of the Library of Congress.  A while ago, I wrote an article in the LCCN that described how Carolyn Keene, the author of the Nancy Drew series, was not actually a person, but rather […]

Presidents, the Other National Pastime

The following is a guest post is by Betty Lupinacci, Lead Technician for Legal Processing Workflow Resolution in our Collection Services Division.  It is part travelogue which includes a visit to an inaugural site for a US President outside Washington, DC. What does a trip to Cooperstown, NY have to do with this week’s Inaugural theme?  Well, […]

Treaty on the Creation of the Soviet Union – Signed, Sealed, and Delivered?

The following is a guest post by Peter Roudik, Director of the Global Legal Research Center and a specialist on the laws of Eastern European and former Soviet Union jurisdictions. In previous posts, my colleagues have discussed different types of laws from various countries.  These have included unusual laws, little-known laws, and laws that were […]