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Andrew Winston, AALL Emerging Leader Award

The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Emerging Leader Award recognizes the contributions of newer members and their potential leadership and service in the profession.  Law Library of Congress Legal Reference Specialist, Andrew Winston has been named one of this year’s Emerging Leaders.  AALL is a national association which allows law librarians from county law libraries, law schools, law firms, and government agencies to connect and learn from each other.  AALL also recognizes law librarians through various awards for “service to the profession and contributions to legal literature and materials.”  Andrew will officially receive his award at the 2016 AALL annual meeting in Chicago.

Andrew has been actively involved in law library professional organizations.  He currently serves as vice chair of the Bylaws and Resolutions Committee of AALL and will become chair of the committee in July of this year.   Last year, he attended AALL’s first Business Skills Clinic, and in 2014 he was selected for the AALL Leadership Academy.  We congratulate Andrew on his award and look for great things from him in the future.

Andrew Winston / Photograph by Donna Sokol

Andrew Winston / Photograph by Donna Sokol

How Judges Are Selected in Germany

When President Obama announced the nomination of Merrick B. Garland, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to replace Justice Antonin Scalia on March 16, 2016, it garnered a lot of media attention. Thinking about my native Germany, I realized that I could not remember hearing or reading […]

500 Year Anniversary of the Bavarian Beer Purity Law of 1516 (“Reinheitsgebot”)

On April 23, 2016, breweries all over Germany and particularly in the Free State of Bavaria will celebrate the 500 year anniversary of the enactment of the Bavarian Reinheitsgebot (beer purity law); a regulation that mandates which ingredients are allowed for the brewing of beer. The Reinheitsgebot is one of the oldest food regulations in […]

World Health Day

This is a guest post by Constance Johnson, a senior legal research analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  Constance has previously written on Water Rights on Star Island, Law Relating to Refugee Rights – Global Legal Collection Highlights, and most recently on her summer vacation on Star Island. April 7, 2016, is World Health […]

FALQs: New Zealand’s Flag Referendums

Between March 3 and March 24, 2016, New Zealanders were able to vote in the country’s second referendum related to whether or not to change the official flag.  Previously, in November-December 2015, voting in the first referendum narrowed the list of possible alternative flag designs from five to one; the second referendum was a run-off […]

Legal Challenges for Uber in the European Union and in Germany

The following is a guest post by Jenny Gesley, a foreign law specialist covering Germany and other German-speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress.  Jenny has contributed several posts to this blog, including posts on the Regulation of Electronic Cigarettes in Germany, constitutional challenges related to the privatization of air traffic control in Germany, and […]

When is a Book Not a Book?

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and several other Asian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Sayuri has previously written blog posts about testing of older drivers in Japan, sentencing of parents who kill children, English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws […]

State Primary Election Laws

It is election primary season here in the United States.  Iowa and New Hampshire have voted, and the South Carolina Republican primary took place this past Saturday, February 20th.  The South Carolina Democratic primary will take place this coming Saturday, February 27th.  As is often the case in the United States, each state has different […]

Tribute to Justice Antonin Scalia — Pic of the Week

In tribute to Justice Antonin Scalia’s life and commitment to the rule of law, this pic of the week features Justice Scalia at the Library’s Magna Carta evening gala. Justice Scalia was a monumental legal thinker, who was known for his deep reverence of the United States Constitution, exuberant personality, and interest in opera. Therefore, it probably does […]

Associate Justice Antonin Scalia

The following is a guest post by James Martin, senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  James has previously written on The District of Columbia 1862 Emancipation Law and The Articles of Confederation: The First Constitution of the United States. Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Antonin Scalia died in Texas […]