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Global Legal Monitor: May Highlights

In May, twenty-five articles were published in the Global Legal Monitor (GLM), the Law Library’s online publication covering various legal developments around the globe.  The following is a list of the five most viewed articles in the order of their popularity: China: New Visa System Proposed, Public Opinion Being Solicited Brazil: No More Visa Cap for Haitian […]

Banning Baby Names

At the start of May for the last few years I’ve seen multiple news items about the baby names that were rejected by the New Zealand authorities during the previous year (e.g., Lucifer, Prince, J, Rogue…).  The list of names, and the fact that the government is able to deem them unacceptable, draws plenty of interest […]

The UK’s Legal Response to the London Bombings of 7/7

The history of anti-terrorism legislation in the UK is expansive and dates back nearly a century.  The UK’s anti-terrorism laws have typically been reactive and enacted as emergency temporary legislation that later essentially became permanent through constant renewal.  The anti-terrorism laws have their genesis in the troubled relationship between Great Britain and Ireland over the […]

May Commemorative Observances

A few years ago, the Law Library was asked to research and create web pages on commemorative observances. The project included identification of the laws which were passed and presidential proclamations which were issued to establish and annually observe these commemorations.  The relevant pages can be found on the Law Library’s website under “Legal Topics.” Over the past two […]

Official, Authenticated, Preserved, and Accessible: The Uniform Electronic Legal Material Act

The following guest post is by Butch Lazorchak, a digital archivist at the Library of Congress.  It is cross posted on The Signal. Digital technology makes documents easy to alter or copy, leading to multiple non-identical versions that can be used in unauthorized or illegitimate ways. Unfortunately, the ease of alteration has introduced doubt in users’ minds […]

European Union: Where is the Beef?

The following is a guest post by my colleague, Theresa Papademetriou, who is the Law Library of Congress Senior Foreign Law Specialist for the European Union, Greece, and Cyprus. Theresa has previously blogged on “New Greek Regulation Designed to Fight Tax Evasion Problem: Will it Work?” and on “The Cyprus Banking Crisis and its Aftermath: Bank Depositors […]

Law Library Report on Wildlife Trafficking and Poaching

You may have noticed that the issue of poaching and trafficking in wildlife, particularly involving African elephants and rhinos, has been in the news a lot lately.  This is mainly because the situation, apparently fueled by an appetite for illegal wildlife products in Asia (especially China and Thailand), is getting increasingly dire.  The decline in […]

The Cyprus Banking Crisis and its Aftermath: Bank Depositors be Aware

The following is a guest post by my colleague, Theresa Papademetriou, who is the Law Library of Congress Senior Foreign Law Specialist for the European Union, Greece, and Cyprus. Theresa has previously blogged on “New Greek Regulation Designed to Fight Tax Evasion Problem: Will it Work?”  Cyprus, which has been a member of the European Union […]