{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

European Union: Where is the Beef?

The following is a guest post by my colleague, Theresa Papademetriou, who is the Law Library of Congress Senior Foreign Law Specialist for the European Union, Greece, and Cyprus. Theresa has previously blogged on “New Greek Regulation Designed to Fight Tax Evasion Problem: Will it Work?” and on “The Cyprus Banking Crisis and its Aftermath: Bank Depositors […]

Law Library Report on Wildlife Trafficking and Poaching

You may have noticed that the issue of poaching and trafficking in wildlife, particularly involving African elephants and rhinos, has been in the news a lot lately.  This is mainly because the situation, apparently fueled by an appetite for illegal wildlife products in Asia (especially China and Thailand), is getting increasingly dire.  The decline in […]

The Cyprus Banking Crisis and its Aftermath: Bank Depositors be Aware

The following is a guest post by my colleague, Theresa Papademetriou, who is the Law Library of Congress Senior Foreign Law Specialist for the European Union, Greece, and Cyprus. Theresa has previously blogged on “New Greek Regulation Designed to Fight Tax Evasion Problem: Will it Work?”  Cyprus, which has been a member of the European Union […]

Marmite: A Sticky Legal Situation

You may know what it is, but you may never have tried it.  Or you may have tried it and screwed up your nose at the strange salty flavor.  However, to many people – myself included – it is “black gold.”  So I panicked along with many other New Zealanders when supplies of Marmite ran […]

Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month.  This year, March has also seen the Centennial of the 1913 Suffrage March, and International Women’s Day.  Women’s History Month was established in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 to establish Women’s History Week.  Both this law and the subsequent Presidential Proclamation 4903 speak to the important role women played […]

A Fresh Update on the Canonical Rules on the Election of a New Pontiff

The following is a guest post by Dante Figueroa, Senior Legal Information Analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  Dante has previously written blog posts on canon law and the papacy:  Canon Law Update; Citizenship in the Vatican City State; Medieval Canon Law; and The Papal Inquisition in Modena.    The posting Canonical Rules on the […]

Centennial of the 1913 Suffrage March

As a graduate of Oberlin College, I have always been proud that when Oberlin was established in 1833, it was the first co-educational college in the country, admitting both men and women.  However, it did not initially admit men and women on the same terms: women were not admitted to the baccalaureate program until 1837.   […]