{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

When is a Book Not a Book?

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and several other Asian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Sayuri has previously written blog posts about testing of older drivers in Japan, sentencing of parents who kill children, English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws […]

State Primary Election Laws

It is election primary season here in the United States.  Iowa and New Hampshire have voted, and the South Carolina Republican primary took place this past Saturday, February 20th.  The South Carolina Democratic primary will take place this coming Saturday, February 27th.  As is often the case in the United States, each state has different […]

Tribute to Justice Antonin Scalia — Pic of the Week

In tribute to Justice Antonin Scalia’s life and commitment to the rule of law, this pic of the week features Justice Scalia at the Library’s Magna Carta evening gala. Justice Scalia was a monumental legal thinker, who was known for his deep reverence of the United States Constitution, exuberant personality, and interest in opera. Therefore, it probably does […]

Associate Justice Antonin Scalia

The following is a guest post by James Martin, senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  James has previously written on The District of Columbia 1862 Emancipation Law and The Articles of Confederation: The First Constitution of the United States. Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Antonin Scalia died in Texas […]

Murder as Statecraft

The following is a guest post by Peter Roudik, director of legal research at the Law Library of Congress. Peter specializes in Russia and the former Soviet Union. He has written a number of posts on topics related to countries in that region, including posts on Christmas, Soviet Style; Soviet investigation of Nazi war crimes, lustration in Ukraine, […]

Hawaii Added to the Indigenous Law Portal

The Library of Congress debuted the Indigenous Law Portal back in 2014, starting with coverage for tribes located within the continental United States. Since that time, the portal has expanded to include Alaska, Canada, and Mexico. Constructed upon the Library’s K Classification system, the Indigenous Law Portal features links to current legal materials from the […]

FALQs: Saudi Arabia Municipal Elections – Women Participate for the First Time

The following is a guest post by George Sadek, a senior legal research analyst at the Law Library of Congress. George has contributed a number of posts to this blog, including posts on Egypt’s new antiterrorism law, the legal processes available to imprisoned journalists in Egypt, the trial of Seif al Islam al Gaddafi, and […]

Nobel Week Highlighted by In Custodia Legis – Pic of the Week

This week our In Custodia Legis team celebrated Nobel Week with the Swedes and millions of others around the globe. The ten individual 2015 Nobel Laureates were honored in the Nobel Prize Award ceremony yesterday in Stockholm, Sweden, with the Nobel Peace Prize to be awarded in Oslo, Norway on Saturday, December 12. If you are enthusiastic about awards […]

Alfred Nobel’s Will: A Legal Document that Might Have Changed the World and a Man’s Legacy

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg. Elin is a foreign law research consultant who covers Scandinavian countries at the Law Library of Congress. Elin is a frequent contributor to In Custodia Legis. Her most recent posts discuss the Danish and Swedish responses to the current refugee crisis. Other posts authored by Elin […]

Legal Aspects of Unmanned Systems – Part 2: Lethal Autonomous Weapons

In my August post, Legal Aspects of Unmanned Systems – Part 1: Civilian Uses, I highlighted legal concerns associated with the application of unmanned systems in civilian settings, including the potential impact of their use on safety, security, privacy, and property rights, as well as the possible application of criminal laws regarding their use. This […]