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United States Treaties Added to the Law Library Website

We have added the United States Treaty Series, compiled by Charles I. Bevans, to our online digital collection.  This collection includes treaties that the United States signed with other countries from 1776 to 1949. The collection consists of 13 volumes: four volumes of multilateral treaties, eight volumes of bilateral treaties and one volume of an index. Multilateral […]

Cherokee National Holiday

Osiyo! The 64th Cherokee National Holiday will be celebrated from September 2-4 this year. The annual holiday commemorates the signing of the 1839 Cherokee Constitution and the Act of Union reuniting Cherokees both East and West after the Trail of Tears. The three-day festival is one of the largest in Oklahoma, where traditional and modern […]

How to Contact Your Representative or Senator: A Beginner’s Guide

This post is coauthored by Barbara Bavis, instructional librarian, and Robert Brammer, senior legal reference specialist The First Amendment to the United States Constitution states: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people […]

Today is Women’s Equality Day!

On August 26, 1920, Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby certified the 19th amendment of the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. Thanks to Congresswoman Bella S. Abzug, this landmark moment, and women’s continuous achievements and challenges on the path toward equality under the law are commemorated every August 26 on Women’s […]

On Describing the Law Library’s Hispanic Legal Documents Collection

This is a guest post by Patience Tyne. Patience is working in the Collection Services Division of the Law Library of Congress as part of the Library of Congress’s Junior Fellows Program. The program’s focus is to increase access to our collections for our various patron groups. The project that I am working on in […]

How Do You Say “Library” in…?

This week the Library of Congress hosts multiple pre-conferences in Washington, DC before the main International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) conference in Columbus, OH. If you are visiting DC for one of the pre-conferences, be sure to share your experiences on Twitter with the hashtag #IFLAPREatLOC. To make guests feel welcome, I’ve asked a few […]

Law Library Event—The Depiction of Law in Film and Television

“You have the right to remain silent” are words that have become ubiquitous in American popular culture due to the many reiterations of the Miranda warning in television and film. The Miranda warning, which protects defendants against self-incrimination during criminal interrogations, is the result of the 1966 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Miranda v. Arizona. This […]

New Report on Education as a Constitutional Right in Foreign Countries

The following is a guest post by Luis Acosta, a division chief in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. An interesting aspect of comparative constitutional analysis considers how differences in countries’ histories and legal cultures are reflected in national constitutions. A recent Law Library of Congress report highlights such differences […]