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Five Questions with Pamela Barnes Craig, Retiring Instruction/Reference Librarian for the Law Library of Congress

The following is a guest post from Pamela Barnes Craig, retiring Instruction/Reference Librarian in the Law Library of Congress.   It is cross posted on Teaching with the Library of Congress.   Describe what you do at the Library of Congress and the materials you work with. Pam Craig talks with teachers at the 2013 Summer Teacher […]

Magna Carta in the US, Part I: The British Pavilion of the 1939 New York World’s Fair

From November 6 through January 19, 2015, the Lincoln Cathedral Magna Carta, one of four remaining originals from 1215 will be on display along with other rare materials from the Library’s rich collections to tell the story of 800 years of its influence on the history of political liberty.  This is the first installment in a series […]

Murder, Movies and the Law

We are at it again – working on one of our posts about movies and the law.  This time we are looking at movies which depict murder trials.  Although posts about movies and the law might seem somewhat lighthearted, movies are a powerful cultural force which often reflect society’s attitudes and understanding of various ideas. To […]

Literature and Law

This is a guest post by Jennifer Davis, a supervisory collection specialist in our Collection Services Division at the Law Library of Congress. Hurrying to work in the morning is a good time to think of to-do lists, song lyrics and snatches of poetry. Like most DC workers, I have been lucky enough to hustle […]

Was a 9-Month-old Boy Really Charged with Attempted Murder in Pakistan?

The following is a guest post by Shameema Rahman, senior legal research specialist in our Public Services Division. You may have heard about an incredible article with the headline, “9-month-old boy on the run after attempted murder charge in Pakistan” that appeared in the Washington Times on April 8th. Several news outlets, including CNN News,  have subsequently clarified […]

SEAALL 2014

From April 3-5, 2014, law librarians from around the Southeast converged on Knoxville, Tennessee for the annual meeting of the Southeastern Chapter of the American Association of Law Libraries (SEAALL).  There were a variety of excellent presentations to choose from, and the following are just a few of my highlights from the conference. The Conference kicked off with […]

Pic of the Week – The Digital Commons at the D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Branch Library

We enjoy bringing you photos of the unique libraries, ancient and modern, that we encounter during our travels. In celebration of this year’s National Library Week theme, “lives change @ your library,”  we bring you photos of a unique library close to home. Since the inception of the personal computer and the rise of the internet, public […]

Tribute to Robert Gee

The Library of Congress held a celebration of life ceremony yesterday for a former colleague who recently passed away. Robert “Bob” Gee, who most recently was a special assistant to the Associate Librarian of Congress, died on March 12 after a short battle with cancer.  He was surrounded by family at his home in Washington, D.C.  Bob was born […]

A New Akoma Ntoso Tool: the LIME Editor

Monica Palmirani, one of the judges of our Legislative Data Challenges, recently alerted us to a new tool developed by the University of Bologna: the LIME Editor. This open source, web-based editor allows for the quick conversion of non-structured legal documents into XML, including Akoma Ntoso XML. The tool combines a component-based JavaScript framework and […]

National Poetry Month and Bad King John

The following post is cross posted on the From the Catbird Seat: Poetry & Literature blog. Magna Carta is coming to the Library of Congress in November 2014!  This document is regarded as being one of the foundations of representative government and at the same time marked a defeat of the king by his barons.  But long before 1215, […]