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Preparing Witnesses For Trial: A Beginner’s Guide

This post was co-authored by Barbara Bavis and Robert Brammer, Legal Reference Specialists. When discussing the use of witnesses at trial, attention often focuses on the use of witnesses in criminal actions, such as how eyewitness identifications are made or whether improper behavior, like witness tampering, has affected the outcome of a trial. However, witnesses […]

Our New Report Looks at Bitcoin in 40 Countries

The foreign law specialists and analysts at the Law Library of Congress recently completed a report that highlights the emerging global discussion around approaches to regulating virtual currencies, particularly Bitcoin.  This is of course a hot topic right now, and the report has been written about in news articles and blogs and referred to on […]

Mexico’s Constitution and Its Square, the Zócalo

Today, I return to blogging for In Custodia Legis after a considerable hiatus.  That gap came from being involved in other projects, among these the Library of Congress Leadership Development Program and the coordination of the Library’s recent Celebration of Mexico and tribute to the Living Legend Award Winner, Dr. Miguel León-Portilla. In keeping with Mexican and Spanish […]

Stereoview of the Madison Building Closed Stacks

The Law Library of Congress is the largest law library in the world, and much of its vast collection is housed in the Madison Building’s sub-basement stacks. Whenever a patron requests an item that does not have “RR” at the end of the call number, our expert staff combs through our vast collection of over 2.5 million volumes to locate the item […]

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2014

  Martin Luther King, Jr. Day will be observed as a federal holiday this year on Monday, January 20.  Christine wrote about Martin Luther King, Jr. Day back in 2011.  That post remains one of the most-visited pages on our blog.  Recently, Jeanine interviewed Chuck Verrill, who was present at the March on Washington in […]

“I’ll be damned if I don’t do it!”: The Failed Assassination Attempt on President Andrew Jackson

On January 30, 1835, an unemployed painter by the name of Richard Lawrence made the first attempt on the life of a sitting U.S. President. That damp, misty day, President Andrew Jackson had traveled to the Capitol Building to attend a Congressional funeral in the House Wing. As the President exited the funeral, he approached […]

New Year’s Greetings from the Law Librarian of Congress

This is a guest post by the Law Librarian of Congress, David Mao, who has previously written about state government contracts, Justifying Speed, and Food for Thought, among other topics. The New Year’s Greeting for 2013 is available for download in PDF format: 2013_new_years_letter.   FORWARD PROGRESS The Law Library of Congress Made Great Strides in Reaching Its Strategic Goals for […]

Congress – The Second Session

We have written a number of posts about Lame Duck congresses and what happens at the beginning of a new Congress, but we thought this year we would take a moment to talk about what happens during the second session of a Congress. Before the ratification of the Twentieth Amendment in 1933, Congress began on […]

Islamic Law in Pakistan – Global Legal Collection Highlights

The following is a guest post by Tariq Ahmad, a Legal Analyst in the Global Legal Research Center of the Law Library of Congress.  This is not Tariq’s first contribution; he has previously blogged about the Law Library’s June 4, 2013 Panel Discussion on Islamic Law and  Sedition Law in India. The Law Library of Congress […]