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Eastern State Penitentiary – Pics of the Week

On a recent trip to Philadelphia, I stopped at the Eastern State Penitentiary. Opened in 1829, this was the most famous and expensive prison of its time.  Tourists and researchers came from around the world to study this innovative prison system, including Alexis de Tocqueville and Charles Dickens. Eastern State Penitentiary was famous because it […]

Anniversary of Thurgood Marshall’s Swearing-In to the Supreme Court

Today is the anniversary of Justice Thurgood Marshall’s swearing-in as an associate justice of the Supreme Court on October 2, 1967. He was the Court’s 96th justice and the first African American to hold a seat on the Supreme Court. President Lyndon Johnson nominated the then-Solicitor General Marshall on June 13, 1967 to fill the post […]

The Palais Royal in Paris – Pics of the Week

This is a guest post by Nicolas Boring who has previously written for the blog on a variety of topics including FALQs: Freedom of Speech in France, How Sunday Came to be a Day of Rest in France, Napoleon Bonaparte and Mining Rights in France, French Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights, and co-collaborated on the post, Does the […]

Weights and Measurements

The Great British Baking Show is airing again this fall and I have to confess it is one of my favorite shows.  I love the restrained and understated manner of the participants and judges, and enjoy picking up various tips and hints for my own baking.  I am also fascinated by the British passion for […]

Magna Carta Connection in Historic Jamestown – Pic of the Week

Magna Carta has had a great influence both on the United States Constitution and on the constitutions of the various states. Sharing in Magna Carta’s 800th anniversary, the Library of Congress celebrated with an exhibition and a year-long program of events. On a recent trip southeast, I stopped at Jamestown in the Colonial National Historical Park […]