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How Do You Say “Library” in…?

This week the Library of Congress hosts multiple pre-conferences in Washington, DC before the main International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) conference in Columbus, OH. If you are visiting DC for one of the pre-conferences, be sure to share your experiences on Twitter with the hashtag #IFLAPREatLOC. To make guests feel welcome, I’ve asked a few […]

Law Library Event—The Depiction of Law in Film and Television

“You have the right to remain silent” are words that have become ubiquitous in American popular culture due to the many reiterations of the Miranda warning in television and film. The Miranda warning, which protects defendants against self-incrimination during criminal interrogations, is the result of the 1966 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Miranda v. Arizona. This […]

New Report on Education as a Constitutional Right in Foreign Countries

The following is a guest post by Luis Acosta, a division chief in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. An interesting aspect of comparative constitutional analysis considers how differences in countries’ histories and legal cultures are reflected in national constitutions. A recent Law Library of Congress report highlights such differences […]

An Interview with Ricardo Wicker, Foreign Law Intern

Today’s interview is with Ricardo Wicker, a foreign law intern currently working with Nicolas Boring on research related to the laws of France and other French-speaking jurisdictions. Describe your background. I am a law student at the University of Montreal, where I am pursuing a combined a degree from the LL.B./J.D. program. During my training, I have […]

Laws Behind the Rio Olympics

The following is a guest post by Eduardo Soares, a foreign law specialist from Brazil who covers Portuguese-speaking jurisdictions. Eduardo has previously written posts on the Brazilian law collection, capoeira and the law, a Law Library report on citizenship pathways and border protection, highlights of the Law Library’s collection of materials related to the development […]

Happy Swiss National Day!

On August 1, Switzerland commemorates the signing of what is generally considered to be the founding document of the Swiss Confederation, the Federal Charter of 1291 (Bundesbrief von 1291). It is believed that approximately on this date, representatives from the cantons of Uri, Schwyz and Nidwalden met on the Rütli meadow and pledged allegiance to […]