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International Law Books – Pics of the Week

This week the annual meeting of the American Society of International Law is taking place in Washington, D.C.  Peter wrote about attending the conference a couple of years ago.  Several of our staff members are attending various seminars, where they will learn about the latest developments in international law from scholars and practitioners from all […]

Lemon Laws: A Beginner’s Guide

This post is coauthored by Barbara Bavis and Robert Brammer, senior legal reference specialists. In response to our last post on consumer protection law, we determined there was additional interest in “lemon laws.”  Lemon laws are defined by Black’s Law Dictionary as statutes “designed to protect a consumer who buys a substandard automobile, usu[ally] by […]

Opening Day and the Law

I read with interest Kelly’s post last week regarding cricket and the law, especially the section on the Indian case where the plaintiffs stated that watching the sport was a matter of “right to life and personal liberty.” Today being the Washington Nationals‘ Opening Day, it got me thinking about our National Pastime and how […]

April Fools’ Day Quiz Answers

As promised, here are the answers and the citations for yesterday’s post, April Fools’ Day Quiz – Star Trek Court Cases.  Although some of the cases have been cited by elsewhere, I also tried to find others that are less familiar.  And I discovered that composing made-up opinions was quite difficult!  The best method seemed […]

An Interview with Laura Fry and Megan Martinsen

The following is a guest post by Jennifer Gonzalez, our web editor in the Digital Resources Division at the Law Library of Congress.  Jennifer previously blogged about American Indian Constitutions. For the last week, I have had the pleasure of working with two library students from the University of Texas at Austin, Laura Fry and Megan Martinsen. […]

It’s Just Not Cricket!

(The phrase “it’s just not cricket” is used to say that “something is unfair or dishonest”; “not done.” Perhaps it could have been exclaimed by some of the parties involved in the cases below?) The baseball season starts next week, but in other parts of the world the focus over the last six weeks has […]

FALQs: Freedom of Speech in France

Back in January, Nicolas kicked off our “FALQs” (aka “Frequently Asked Legal Questions”) series with a post on terrorism in France.  He was asked on Twitter to continue the series with a post on freedom of speech in France.  He has previously blogged about “How Sunday Came to be a Day of Rest in France,” “Napoleon Bonaparte […]