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New Law Library Reports Cover Access to Encrypted Communications and Intelligence Gathering

More and more internet traffic is encrypted. Encryption is a method of protecting electronic information by converting it into an unintelligible form (encoding) so that it can only be decoded with a key. Google stated in its latest transparency report that 85% of requests from around the world to Google’s servers used encrypted connections in […]

An Interview with Molly O’Casey, Foreign Law Intern

Today’s interview is with Molly O’Casey, a foreign law intern working with Nicolas Boring on research related to the laws of France and other French-speaking jurisdictions and with Clare Feikert-Ahalt on research related to the United Kingdom and a number of Commonwealth jurisdictions. Molly has recently graduated from a dual law degree (civil law/common law) […]

Law Library of Congress and Poetry and Literature Center to Host Award-Winning Poet Monica Youn

On the evening of Thursday, October 20, 2016, the Library of Congress will host award-winning poet and attorney Monica Youn. Youn will read from her latest collection of poetry, Blackacre (Graywolf Press, 2016), which has been longlisted for the National Book Award in Poetry. Youn will also participate in a conversation with Martha Dragich, professor […]

Wisconsin State Capitol – Pic of the Week

I recently had the pleasure of visiting Madison, Wisconsin, and while there I took a few minutes to tour the state’s beautiful capitol building.  I enjoy seeing various capitol buildings and previously blogged about my tour of the Indiana State House. You might not be able to tell from the above photo, but the capitol […]

Nuremberg Trial Verdicts

Seventy years ago – on October 1, 1946 – the Nuremberg trial, one of the most prominent trials of the last century, concluded when the International Military Tribunal (IMT) issued the verdicts for the main war criminals of the Second World War. The IMT sentenced twelve of the defendants to death, seven to terms of […]

Australian and New Zealand Parliamentary Website Makeovers

Over the last couple of years you have read about the change from the THOMAS legislative information website to Congress.gov, and the many enhancements that have occurred along the way. While not as significant as this migration to a completely new website, both the Australian and New Zealand parliamentary websites have undergone makeovers this year. […]

Welsh Legal History

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, foreign law specialist for the United Kingdom and a number of Commonwealth jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress.  Clare has previously written many interesting posts, most recently: FALQs: Brexit Referendum and The Case of a Ghost Haunted England for Over Two Hundred Years. Frequently, the four […]