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The Peace of Westphalia

On October 24, 1648, the Peace of Westphalia formally ended the Thirty Years’ War in Europe. The Peace of Westphalia consists of two different documents, the Peace Treaty of Osnabrück (Instrumentum pacis Osnabrugensis)  between the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation (HRE) and Sweden, and the Peace Treaty of Münster (Instrumentum Pacis Monasteriensis)  between […]

FALQs: Cashless Sweden

Today’s guest post was authored by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law research consultant covering Scandinavian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Elin’s recent post, FALQs: Name Day Celebrations in Sweden, motivated me to research the regulation of names in Israel. Elin is a frequent contributor to In Custodia Legis and has blogged on many topics, including on Alfred […]

Professor of Law Jeremy Waldron to Deliver the 2017 Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence

The Law Library of Congress is pleased to announce that legal and political philosophy professor Jeremy Waldron of New York University School of Law, will deliver the 2017 Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence. The lecture, “The Philosophical Foundations of Immigration Law,” is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 1. […]

ADHD Awareness Month, IEPs and 504 Plans

October is ADHD Awareness Month. ADHD, which stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, “is a brain disorder marked by an ongoing pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development.” ADHD is a complex mental health issue, as all mental health issues are, but this disorder is complicated because there are no physical […]

House Communications Are Now Available in Congress.gov!

As part of our latest Congress.gov enhancements, we are excited to provide access to House Communications transmitted from January 6, 2015-present (since the 114th Congress convened). House Communications frequently consist of petitions by state and local officials, memorials, messages from the President, and reports submitted to the House by executive agencies that are sometimes required by federal […]

1st International Assembly of Law Libraries at UNAM: Law Libraries Within a Global Information Society

On August 3 and 4, 2017, I had the distinct privilege of representing the Law Library of Congress at one of Latin America’s most lauded institutes of legal research. In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, I would like to share some highlights of what transpired there. The following is a recap authored by Celia Carreón […]

Four Corners of Law, Charleston, SC – Pic of the Week

I cannot seem to travel without encountering something law-related. During my recent trip to Charleston, South Carolina, our tour guide took us to the “Four Corners of Law” at the intersection of Broad Street and Meeting Street. The term refers to the four buildings that are located at that intersection which represent municipal, county, federal, and ecclesiastical […]

What’s in a[n Israeli] name?

Several In Custodia Legis team members have previously written about regulation of naming in a variety of countries, including Germany; Iceland ; New Zealand; Sweden; and Taiwan. I thought it would be interesting to see how Israel, my primary research jurisdiction, regulates names. The Most Popular Israeli Names (Good to Know Ruth is not Completely Outdated) Checking […]