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FALQs: Legal Framework for Fighting Corruption in Brazil (Part I)

The following is a guest post by Eduardo Soares, a foreign law specialist from Brazil who covers Portuguese-speaking countries at the Law Library of Congress. Eduardo has previously published posts about the Brazilian law collection, capoeira and the law, a Law Library report on citizenship pathways and border protection, highlights of the Law Library’s collection […]

Jewish American Heritage Month Display

Each year Congress designates May as Jewish American Heritage Month, “honoring the contributions of Jewish Americans to the United States of America.” The Law Library’s website has a page dedicated to the history of this observance. So this year, the Collection Services Division has put together a display of items from our collection that showcases […]

Thingvellir – Northern Europe’s First Parliament

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law consultant at the Law Library of Congress who covers Scandinavian countries.  Elin has previously written posts on Alfred Nobel’s will, the Danish and Swedish responses to the current refugee crisis, legal names in Iceland, the bicentenary of the Norwegian Constitution, National Sami Day, and […]

Andrew Winston, AALL Emerging Leader Award

The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Emerging Leader Award recognizes the contributions of newer members and their potential leadership and service in the profession.  Law Library of Congress Legal Reference Specialist, Andrew Winston has been named one of this year’s Emerging Leaders.  AALL is a national association which allows law librarians from county law […]

How Judges Are Selected in Germany

When President Obama announced the nomination of Merrick B. Garland, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to replace Justice Antonin Scalia on March 16, 2016, it garnered a lot of media attention. Thinking about my native Germany, I realized that I could not remember hearing or reading […]

A Spring Holiday for Workers

The following is a guest post by Peter Roudik, director of legal research at the Law Library of Congress. Peter has written a number of posts related to Russia and the former Soviet Union, including posts on the Soviet investigation of Nazi war crimes, lustration in Ukraine, Crimean history and the 2014 referendum, regulating the […]

Time to Turn off THOMAS: July 5, 2016

One of my favorite THOMAS related posts was of the THOMAS Starting Point, which featured the homepage of the site when it launched on January 5, 1995.  It seems only fitting to share the photo from the post while announcing the THOMAS Ending Point of July 5, 2016. I have talked frequently about THOMAS on In Custodia Legis […]

Poetic Justice

The following is a guest post by Brandon Fitzgerald, project manager of a Law Library staffing contract, writer and student of poetry and literature. Upon first reading the news of Justice Antonin Scalia’s recent passing, I recalled a 2015 study crowning him the most literary justice among current justices for citing notable authors 39 times […]