{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

FALQs: Beef Bans in India

The following is a guest post by Tariq Ahmad, a legal research analyst in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. Tariq has previously contributed posts on Islamic Law in Pakistan – Global Legal Collection Highlights, the Law Library’s June 4, 2013 Panel Discussion on Islamic Law, Sedition Law in India, […]

On the Shelf: South African Gazette

In this edition of On the Shelf we’re examining a rather large title both in size of the individual volumes and the total number of volumes that comprise a complete set. Staatskoerant is the current official government gazette of the Republic of South Africa. The title has been published continuously since 1961 when South Africa […]

Eastern State Penitentiary – Pics of the Week

On a recent trip to Philadelphia, I stopped at the Eastern State Penitentiary. Opened in 1829, this was the most famous and expensive prison of its time.  Tourists and researchers came from around the world to study this innovative prison system, including Alexis de Tocqueville and Charles Dickens. Eastern State Penitentiary was famous because it […]

Historical Statutes at Large Added to the Law Library’s Website

Last year, we added Statutes at Large to our Digitized Material page. Initially, each Congress from 1789-1950 had a webpage that included a large PDF file of all statutes for that congressional session. Then we began splitting the large PDF documents into smaller pieces, which meant that we had to browse each statute, add metadata to […]

Locating a Compiled Federal Legislative History: A Beginner’s Guide

This post is coauthored by Barbara Bavis and Robert Brammer, senior legal reference specialists. Compiling a federal legislative history may seem daunting, but it does not have to be. We hope, through our last few Beginner’s Guides, that we have made this process easier for researchers.  There is another, possibly less complicated, option for finding […]

Acting Law Librarian of Congress Roberta Shaffer Discusses Harvard’s Free the Law Project

We here at the Law Library of Congress are excited to learn that the Harvard Law School Library and the legal research platform, Ravel, are teaming up to scan and make available online 40 million pages of American caselaw from Harvard’s vast collection. The best part is that this content will be made freely available, […]

Where to Find China’s Provincial Family Planning Regulations

Earlier today China’s official Xinhua News Agency reported that the Communist Party of China (CPC) has issued a communique announcing that all married couples will be allowed to have two children. This decision brings an end to the decades-long “one-child policy.” Still, the new “two-child policy” will need to be adopted by provinces, autonomous regions, […]

FALQs: The European Union’s Approach to the Current Refugee Crisis

The following is a guest post by Theresa Papademetriou, a senior foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress who covers the European Union, Greece, Cyprus and Council of Europe. Theresa has previously blogged on “European Union Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights,” “European Union: Where is the Beef?,” “New Greek Regulation Designed to Fight Tax Evasion Problem: Will […]