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The Sinking of the Lusitania

On May 1, 1915, the RMS Lusitania set sail from New York City to Liverpool, England, carrying 1,959 passengers. On May 7, 1915, the ship was sailing off the Irish coast when a German U-Boat, U-20, fired a torpedo that sank the Lusitania within twenty minutes, killing 1,198 passengers, including 128 Americans. The sinking of […]

Congress.gov Continues…

So far, 2015 has been a great year for Congress.gov.  First, we launched email alerts in February. Then, we added treaty documents and more in March.  With today’s update, improvements have been made to search (results, command line and advanced), alerts, browse, and accessibility. The Federalist Papers have remained a perennially popular item on THOMAS with […]

Baking at the Capitol

No, this is not a post about summer temperatures in Washington, D.C.  Rather, this is a post that a number of us have been dreaming about for several years.  For some curious reason, baking and law librarianship seem to be inextricably linked: many law librarians are master bakers, and those that are not are master […]

An Interview with Jenny Gesley, Foreign Law Specialist

This week’s interview is with Jenny Gesley, our newest foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress Jenny provides research and reference services related to Germany and other German-speaking countries. Describe your background I am a native of Düsseldorf, Germany. During high school, I spent a year as a foreign exchange student at Buffalo […]

End of the War in Europe

Living in the nation’s capital can make one rather jaded.  Another presidential inauguration – another day of clogged metro and closed streets!  The Cherry Blossom Festival – the cherry blossoms are always beautiful – but again the traffic is horrendous.  But last Friday, May 8th, I witnessed a flyover of 15 World War II aircraft […]

Miranda Rights and National Police Week

The following information relies on the recollections and opinions of a retired local jurisdiction law enforcement officer. When Betty wrote her “Legalese” post on terms from legal dictionaries, I mentioned that “mirandize” was one of my favorites. My dad had started his law enforcement career just a few years prior to the Supreme Court’s Miranda […]

National Police Week

This week is National Police Week. President John F. Kennedy is credited with creating the commemoration as part of a proclamation signed in 1962, which designated May 14th as Peace Officers Memorial Day, and the week in which it falls as Police Week.  If you recall my recent post, it takes Congressional action to make […]