{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

An Engraving of The First European Settlement in Florida, Fort Caroline – Pic of the Week

This post is coauthored by Nathan Dorn, rare book curator, and Robert Brammer, senior legal information specialist. Our picture of the week is an image of Fort Caroline, Florida, which was founded by French Huguenots on June 22nd of 1564. This print has a complicated, but interesting history. It is part of a 1591 imprint of Theodor de […]

International Tribunals Web Archive Launched

International tribunals have been around for some time, but the creation of international courts and tribunals to deal with international crimes is a relatively recent occurrence, with the first international criminal tribunal established just after World War II. The Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law defines “international courts and tribunals” as ”permanent judicial bodies made up of independent […]

Proxy Voting in France

The following is a guest post from Nicolas Boring, foreign law specialist covering French speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. France has just finished its election season!  French citizens elected Emmanuel Macron as their new president earlier in May, and they returned to the voting booths on June 11 and June 18 for parliamentary […]

An Interview with Kirstin Nelson, National Agricultural Library’s Law Librarian

Today’s interview is with Law Librarian Kirstin Nelson, a contractor on assignment at our sister institution the National Agricultural Library.  Kirstin helped edit Congressional committee information at the Wikipedia edit-a-thon held at the Library in April. Describe your background. I was born and raised in Nebraska. In early childhood, I lived on the western side […]

Loving v. Virginia: “Banished” for Love

“Absence from those we love is self from self–a deadly banishment.”–William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream At the Library On May 3, 2017, in observance of the approaching 50th anniversary of Loving v. Virginia, the Library of Congress hosted a discussion on this famous interracial-marriage case.  The panel included Patricia Hruby Powell and Shadra Strickland, […]