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Sedition in England: The Abolition of a Law From a Bygone Era

Abolishing ancient laws in England is often no easy task.  A significant degree of research is involved before these laws are amended or abolished.  The research has to be particularly thorough to avoid one of the oldest – that of unintended consequences. The issue of thoroughly researching laws was demonstrated several years ago when the government was […]

Sedition Law in India

The following is a guest post by Tariq Ahmad, a Legal Analyst in the Global Legal Research Center of the Law Library of Congress.  British colonial era laws continue to have relevancy in the legal systems of India and Pakistan.  Ironically, a sedition law used by the British colonial government to suppress nationalist dissent in the […]

The Law Library of Congress at the National Book Festival

As we did with AALL, we decided to collect feedback from Law Library staff about their participation in this year’s National Book Festival (NBF).  As I noted in last week’s post, this is the Law Library’s second year for participating in the National Book Festival and here is what some of the Law Library participants had to […]

Supreme Court of China, 99 Years Ago

While looking through the Law Library of Congress’s collection of a set of valuable Chinese judicial gazettes from the Minguo (or Republican) Period (1912-1949), I came across a picture of the Supreme Court (da li yuan) of China that was taken in 1913, ninety-nine years ago. So what functions did these nine men in the […]

Law Librarian Addresses the 2012 Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction Award Ceremony

On September 20, 2012, Kenneth Randall, dean of the University of Alabama School of Law, presented author Michael Connelly with the second annual Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction for his work, The Fifth Witness. The Fifth Witness is a legal thriller that features Connelly’s recurring character, lawyer Mickey Haller.  Haller represents a woman accused of killing a banker […]

Global Legal Monitor: August Highlights

Our top most viewed Global Legal Monitor articles in August covered seven different legal areas: Communications and Electronic Information; Constitutional Law; Criminal Law and Procedure; Foreign Investment; Immigration; Labor; and Nationality and Citizenship.  Here is a list of these articles in the order of their popularity: Japan: Stricter Sentences for Sex Offenders   South Korea: Permanent […]

Law Library of Congress at the National Book Festival

This has been a busy week for the Law Library of Congress.  We have unveiled Congress.gov (our new legislative website), celebrated Constitution Day, and to round the week out, we are preparing for the National Book Festival.  This will be the Law Library’s second year at the National Book Festival.  Our staff will be manning […]