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National Library of Catalonia – Pic of the Week

In September I attended the International Association of Law Libraries’ (IALL) annual course on international law and legal information.  This year’s course, Catalan Law and Legal Information in a Global Context, was held in Barcelona, Spain. In addition to a full schedule of lectures by legal experts in Catalan law, there were several site visits.  […]

Armistice Day/Veterans Day

As a student of history, I often wonder how many people understand the significance of the date of Veterans Day and why it is always celebrated on the day of the holiday and not, like Labor Day or Memorial Day, observed on a Monday.  The holiday began originally as a commemoration associated with World War I […]

The United States Code Online – Downloadable XML Files and More

The following is a guest post by Rob Sukol, Deputy Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives. Since 1927, the United States Code has been the official codification of Federal statutory law. The Code contains the general and permanent laws of the United States, organized into titles based on subject matter. The printed and online […]

Orin Kerr’s Presentation on the Next Generation Privacy Act

The following is a guest post by Cynthia Jordan, Senior Writer-Editor at the Law Library of Congress. On Monday, September 30, 2013, the Law Library of Congress presented the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation Program on Demography, Technology, and Criminal Justice program at the Library of Congress.  The lecture, titled “The Next Generation Privacy Act,” […]

Boarding School Scandal in Sweden

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a Swedish law specialist working at the Law Library of Congress. Elin was featured in an In Custodia Legis interview on October 19, 2011. What happened? A debate about the existence, operation, and legal aspects of private boarding schools is currently raging in Sweden. Such schools remain […]

1680 – the Pueblo Revolt

For my cousins, growing up in New England, American history began with the Pilgrims and settlement at Jamestown.  But for me, growing up in New Mexico, history began with the 16th century Spanish Conquest and the drive up into New Mexico territory followed, a century later, by the Pueblo Revolt.  The history of the United States […]

Israeli Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights

This blog post is part of our Global Legal Collection Highlights series, launched by the Law Library of Congress in an effort to introduce our readers to foreign legal systems and sources. Several blog posts on various countries have already been published, including on Thailand, Malawi, Indonesia, the European Union, Kuwait, the Russian Federation, and China. This blog post provides […]

Nobel Prize Winner Amartya Sen to Deliver the 2013 Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence

The Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence presents the most distinguished contributors to international jurisprudence, judged through writings, reputation, and broad and continuing influence on contemporary legal scholarship. The series has been generously endowed by Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg. This year’s speaker is Amartya Sen, Nobel Laureate, Thomas W. Lamont Professor at Harvard University […]

An Interview with Gabriel Balayan, Fulbright Scholar

 This week’s interview is with Gabriel Balayan, the Law Library’s first Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence. Describe your background I was born in the capital of Armenia, Yerevan, and spent my childhood there. I am very proud to be from Armenia, part of one of the world’s ancient nations, and the first nation to adopt Christianity as a state […]