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1680 – the Pueblo Revolt

For my cousins, growing up in New England, American history began with the Pilgrims and settlement at Jamestown.  But for me, growing up in New Mexico, history began with the 16th century Spanish Conquest and the drive up into New Mexico territory followed, a century later, by the Pueblo Revolt.  The history of the United States […]

Israeli Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights

This blog post is part of our Global Legal Collection Highlights series, launched by the Law Library of Congress in an effort to introduce our readers to foreign legal systems and sources. Several blog posts on various countries have already been published, including on Thailand, Malawi, Indonesia, the European Union, Kuwait, the Russian Federation, and China. This blog post provides […]

Nobel Prize Winner Amartya Sen to Deliver the 2013 Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence

The Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence presents the most distinguished contributors to international jurisprudence, judged through writings, reputation, and broad and continuing influence on contemporary legal scholarship. The series has been generously endowed by Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg. This year’s speaker is Amartya Sen, Nobel Laureate, Thomas W. Lamont Professor at Harvard University […]

An Interview with Gabriel Balayan, Fulbright Scholar

 This week’s interview is with Gabriel Balayan, the Law Library’s first Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence. Describe your background I was born in the capital of Armenia, Yerevan, and spent my childhood there. I am very proud to be from Armenia, part of one of the world’s ancient nations, and the first nation to adopt Christianity as a state […]

Law Library of Congress Report on Regulations Concerning the Private Possession of Big Cats

The following is a guest post by Laney Zhang, Foreign Law Specialist for China.  Laney is no stranger to In Custodia Legis.  Her previous posts have included: The Rule of Law in China: New Titles in Our Collection; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Author; Trains and Corruption in China; Baby Pandas and the Law: In Memory of Mei […]

An Interview with Nicolas Boring, Foreign Law Specialist

This week’s interview is with Nicolas Boring, Foreign Law Specialist at the Law Library of Congress, who covers France and other French-speaking countries. Nicolas has recently been hired and we wish him “Bienvenue à bord” (welcome on board). Describe your background I am half French and half American. I mostly grew up in France, in the suburbs of Paris […]

The Congress.gov September 2013 Update

In addition to adding the Constitution Annotated (and app) to Congress.gov and prepping for redirecting THOMAS.gov and THOMAS.loc.gov to the new system, we are launching a new set of enhancements today. Several of the changes in this release come from our user feedback. Many people asked to have the current Congress set as the default […]

Law Library Report on Citizenship Pathways and Border Protection in Various Countries

The following is a guest post by Eduardo Soares, our foreign law specialist for Portuguese-speaking countries.  Eduardo has previously written a post for In Custodia Legis on the legal history of capoeira in Brazil. Immigration, citizenship pathways, and border security are recurrent topics in the media.  You may have wondered:  How does immigration work in […]