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An Interview with Yasmeen Khan, Senior Rare Book Conservator at the Library of Congress

From time to time we have the pleasure of working collaboratively with members of other service units of the Library of Congress.  Today’s interview is with Yasmeen Khan, Senior Rare Book Conservator in the Preservation Directorate’s Conservation Division at the Library of Congress.  We have worked with her on numerous conservation projects involving the Law Library’s treasures and […]

November Retrospective

This month we premiered a retirement series that included the top new post of the month, The Final Act – Mark Strattner Reflects on Retirement.  The series also featured An Interview with Alvin J. Wallace and Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow: The Retirement of Stephen Clarke. A couple of our posts were mentioned in other blogs.  Dante’s […]

Historic Bird’s Eye View of The Library of Congress – Pic of the Week

While packing for my move, I ran across an encyclopedia set that I inherited from my grandmother. With an edition date of 1939, I found many of the entries fascinating, such as “The World War” and “Russia.” I looked under the “Washington, D.C.” entry and loved this picture of the Capitol Complex taken from an airplane. […]

Law, a Curse and Life in an Italian Ghetto

Although Alessandro Aldobrandini (1664-1734) was not the first in the long history of Italy’s Aldobrandini family to traverse the cursus honorum of the church’s hierarchy, his record of achievement was substantial: educated first in the Seminario Romano and later in the University of Pisa, where he attained the degree of doctor utriusque juris, he was […]

Referendum on New Zealand’s Voting System

Today (currently Saturday, November 26 in New Zealand) is election day in New Zealand.  In addition to voting for a candidate standing in their district (“electorate“) and for the political party that they want in Parliament, voters will be participating in a referendum on whether the electoral system should be changed. The current electoral system […]

Laws in a Crusader State

On November 27, 1095, Pope Urban II declared the First Crusade at the Council of Clermont. In so doing, he inaugurated a period of centuries of intense, though intermittent, warfare fought at the peripheries of Christendom. The Crusades exist in our historical memory as a period of near constant bloodshed and destruction, but out of the chaos […]

Human Rights Day Event: Save the Date!

The following is a guest post by Constance Johnson, a Legal Research Analyst in the Law Library’s Global Legal Research Center.  She previous guest posted on Water Rights at Star Island. On Friday, December 9, 2011, the Law Library of Congress will hold its fourth annual Human Rights Day celebration.  International Human Rights Day is actually observed on […]