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Five Questions with Pamela Barnes Craig, Retiring Instruction/Reference Librarian for the Law Library of Congress

The following is a guest post from Pamela Barnes Craig, retiring Instruction/Reference Librarian in the Law Library of Congress.   It is cross posted on Teaching with the Library of Congress.   Describe what you do at the Library of Congress and the materials you work with. Pam Craig talks with teachers at the 2013 Summer Teacher […]

Today We Celebrate Law Day

The Law Library of Congress celebrates Law Day each year with a program to commemorate the importance of our rights and the rule of law in American society.  As part of this year’s celebration, Barbara and Robert have prepared a display in the Law Library Reading Room to coincide with today’s program featuring Jeffrey Rosen of the National […]

Magna Carta in the US, Part I: The British Pavilion of the 1939 New York World’s Fair

From November 6 through January 19, 2015, the Lincoln Cathedral Magna Carta, one of four remaining originals from 1215 will be on display along with other rare materials from the Library’s rich collections to tell the story of 800 years of its influence on the history of political liberty.  This is the first installment in a series […]

Murder, Movies and the Law

We are at it again – working on one of our posts about movies and the law.  This time we are looking at movies which depict murder trials.  Although posts about movies and the law might seem somewhat lighthearted, movies are a powerful cultural force which often reflect society’s attitudes and understanding of various ideas. To […]

Shakespeare and King John

April 2014 marks the 450th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s birth.  As a way of combining a salute to Shakespeare and continuing our fascination with all things Magna Carta, I thought I would take a look at Shakespeare’s play, “King John.”  The play is believed to have been written in the 1590s, but it was not […]

Bas-Relief of The Merchant of Venice – Pic of the Week

In honor of National Poetry Month and the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth, today’s Pic of the Week takes a look at a bas-relief that adorns the Folger Shakespeare Library (which is just a few steps away from the Library of Congress buildings). The bas-relief shows the court scene from The Merchant of Venice (Act 4, Scene I).  Portia, the play’s heroine, […]

Literature and Law

This is a guest post by Jennifer Davis, a supervisory collection specialist in our Collection Services Division at the Law Library of Congress. Hurrying to work in the morning is a good time to think of to-do lists, song lyrics and snatches of poetry. Like most DC workers, I have been lucky enough to hustle […]

An Interview with Rob Sukol, Deputy Law Revision Counsel

This week’s interview is with Rob Sukol, Deputy Law Revision Counsel of the U.S. House of Representatives.  Rob previously did the guest post titled “The United States Code Online – Downloadable XML Files and More” on In Custodia Legis. Describe your background. I was born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The music scene in Philly grabbed […]

Was a 9-Month-old Boy Really Charged with Attempted Murder in Pakistan?

The following is a guest post by Shameema Rahman, senior legal research specialist in our Public Services Division. You may have heard about an incredible article with the headline, “9-month-old boy on the run after attempted murder charge in Pakistan” that appeared in the Washington Times on April 8th. Several news outlets, including CNN News,  have subsequently clarified […]