North Korea and Dear Leader: A Peek Inside

The John W. Kluge Center is one of the Library of Congress’s more recently added gems. Since its founding in 2000 via a generous gift from the Center’s namesake, it has brought many of the world’s top intellects to the Library and offered them access to our unparalleled collections in order to do their work and research.

Certainly one of the quirkier and more interesting-sounding of the Center’s programs is a series of two lectures, tomorrow and Wednesday (June 26?27), peeling back the curtain on life and culture in North Korea, easily one of the world’s most mysterious nations.

The FreeRide blog of Express, a publication of The Washington Post, today interviews the woman behind the lectures, Suk Young-Kim, about Kim Jong-il, his country and how she was able to perform research on such a secretive society. (Hint: LOC collections are a major part of it.)

The two lectures she is giving this week focus on North Korean film, which in many ways has become a metaphor for Kim Jong-il to the outside world, and on fashion in NoKo.


  1. Dave
    June 30, 2007 at 9:27 pm

    The more information about Kim and how he’s running the show in North Korea the better. Once people start asking questions things hopefully will get better for the people in North Korea.

  2. Auroin
    July 5, 2007 at 1:46 pm

    @Dave – yep. I agree with you.
    People should ask questions to get better idea for the people in North Korea.

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