National Book Festival: For Your Listening Pleasure

#nbf Heads up: The first batch of podcast interviews with 2009 National Book Festival authors are now online here, on iTunes here (link opens in iTunes client) and on iTunes U here (link opens in iTunes client).

Included in the first round are Junot Diaz, Rickey Minor, James Patterson, George Pelecanos, Nicholas Sparks and David Wroblewski–with more to come.  And they’re all free for the listening!

You can read more about the National Book Festival here, and don’t forget to follow us on on Facebook and on Twitter (@librarycongress), which explains the hashtag at the beginning of this post.  (Digression: Is it a coincidence that hashtags appear to make a hash of the English language?)

In a first for the Library, you can also sign up to receive text/SMS message alerts by texting BOOK to 61399.  (Standard messaging rates apply)

6 Comments

  1. bobArlington
    August 31, 2009 at 4:35 pm

    YAY LOC finally putting audio out in portable format – podcasts! Now I can listen inside my tin can.

  2. MatRope
    August 31, 2009 at 4:39 pm

    Where are the women authors?

  3. Justin Thorp
    September 1, 2009 at 10:47 am

    Are we going to get the same updates on Twitter as would go over the SMS message alerts?

  4. Matt Raymond
    September 1, 2009 at 12:34 pm

    MatRope, that’s just the order in which we’ve been able to schedule them and do the interviews. I talked with Lois Lowry a couple of days ago and am scheduled to talk to Julia Alvarez tomorrow. Hopefully we’ll keep adding to the list as authors make themselves available.

    Justin, I don’t think there will be 100 percent overlap, but there will probably be more overlap as the NBF draws closer.

  5. Ioch.org
    September 2, 2009 at 4:01 am

    Does that include some new author? Just curious! Thanks!

  6. Vikram Kumar
    April 8, 2010 at 2:06 am

    Its really a nice and informative article.

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