But You Don’t Look a Day Over 209 …

Audrey Fischer of the Library’s Public Affairs Office offers this guest blog item for Saturday:

April 24 marks the Library’s 210th anniversary. Let it be said that the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution keeps getting better with age.

In 2000, the Library of Congress celebrated its bicentennial. That same year it embarked on a mission to lead the nation’s effort to preserve “at-risk” digital collections. It was perhaps that leadership effort and the institution’s foray into Web 2.0 that positioned the Library to answer the call to preserve Twitter’s digital archive of public tweets.

 From cuneiform tablets to concise e-messages, and everything in between, the nation’s library—now in its third century— continues to fulfill its mission to preserve the record of human creativity.


  1. Henry Philip Vige
    April 23, 2010 at 7:34 pm

    Wow!! “Happy 210th Birthday Library of Congress!!!” My birthday is April 24th as well. I feel honored knowing that one of my most favorite national treasures shares my birthday!

    Thank You for all that you do for everyone of us!

  2. Joaquim Trindade da Silva
    April 25, 2010 at 2:09 pm

    A Biblioteca do congresso na minha opinião é excelente, quanto aos conteudos e informação da muita boa qualidade e bem redigidos. Parabens.

  3. Anton Lutov Vladimirovich
    April 27, 2010 at 9:22 am

    Happy Birhday Library of Congress.

  4. Amy McDonald
    April 27, 2010 at 4:45 pm

    Happy birthday, LC! My birthday is April 24th, too–which means that I was destined to be a librarian, I think.

    We thought you might like to see what Duke University’s Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library posted to our blog in honor of your birthday: http://dukelibrariesrbmscl.blogspot.com/2010/04/story-of-6487-books.html

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