Pic of the Week: Put a Stamp On It

lose-up view of the statue of Abraham Lincoln, sculpted by Daniel Chester French, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C. Photo by Carol M. Highsmith

Close-up view of the statue of Abraham Lincoln, sculpted by Daniel Chester French, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C. Photo by Carol M. Highsmith

Distinguished architectural photographer Carol M. Highsmith began donating her work to the Prints and Photographs Division at the Library of Congress in 1992. She has photographed landmark buildings and architecture in Washington, D.C. — including the Library of Congress and many monuments — and throughout the United States. Starting in 2002, Highsmith provided scans or photographs she shot digitally with new donations to allow rapid online access throughout the world.

Last month, the United States POst Office announced a new stamp for 2014 using one of Highsmith’s images in the Library’s collection. The stamp features a black-and-white photograph of the statue of President Abraham Lincoln that is housed in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

“In designing the stamp, art director Derry Noyes chose to work with a photograph of a sculpted portrait of Lincoln rather than a more traditional illustration or painting. Carol M. Highsmith’s photograph of this iconic Lincoln statue offered a fresh take,” said the USPO’s blog.

A Feb. 12, 2014, release date has been issued for the Lincoln stamp. You can see more images from the Highsmith Collection here.

One Comment

  1. Oscar Salvador Dávila Sierra
    January 27, 2014 at 3:26 pm

    Magnifico homenaje.
    Felicitaciones al Servicio Postal de EE. UU.

    Gracias a la Biblioteca del Congreso por compartir este fascinante acontecimiento.

    Saludos.

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