Pics of the Week: Celebrating Women’s History

The Library of Congress is an incomparable resource for research into women’s history and studies, which is especially appropriate in March, Women’s History Month. This year’s theme is “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment.”

Spanning all time periods, classes, races and occupations, the Library’s women’s history resources are among the finest and most comprehensive anywhere. Contained in nearly every collection are materials of interest reflecting the full range of women’s experiences.

Signe Wilkinson. “How can I make sure my child won’t suffer from the wage gap between men and women?” Drawing with ink, opaque white, blue pencil. 1988.)

Signe Wilkinson. “How can I make sure my child won’t suffer from the wage gap between men and women?” Drawing with ink, opaque white, blue pencil. 1988.

The Library recently acquired several selections that strengthen the Library’s research holdings in women’s studies, particularly in the Prints and Photographs Division.

An award-winning American political cartoonist, Signe Wilkinson became the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning in 1992. Her wry commentary on the wage gap between the sexes was published in Ms. Magazine in November 1988. Wilkinson has addressed equality issues for women and others over many years.

American artist Carolyn Drake created vibrant photographs of contemporary people in the ancient Silk Road city of Kashgar, China. The photograph on display comes from her “Two Rivers” series, which features more than 30 photographs showing current Central Asian life along the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers.

Carolyn Drake. New Kashgar, Kashgar, China. digital photograph. 2011.

Carolyn Drake. New Kashgar, Kashgar, China. digital photograph. 2011.

 

Ambreen Butt. Untitled print from the series “Daughter of the East.” Etching and aquatint. 2008.

Ambreen Butt. Untitled print from the series “Daughter of the East.” Etching and aquatint. 2008.

Boston-based Pakistani artist Ambreen Butt merges aesthetic elements of Mughal and Persian painting with contemporary subject matter – often relating to the lives of women. Her beautiful work raises many questions about how their roles are changing. The featured print is from a series that shares the title of an autobiography by Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who was assassinated in 2007.

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Rupert García. “Frida Kahlo.” Screen print, 1975. (Photo by Shealah Craighead)

Iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo has been the subject of many works of art. The Library’s recent acquisition of her portrait was created by leading Chicano artist Rupert García. Working with Library curators, artists from San Francisco’s Mission Gráfica and La Raza studios have placed more than 1,000 prints and posters from the 1970s to 2010 in the Library’s collections.

 

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