National Book Festival: 2017 Poster Depicts Delightful World of Books

(The following is a repost from the National Book Festival blog. The author is Lola Pyne of the Library’s Office of Communications.)

2017 National Book Festival poster by Roz Chast

Spring is in the air and with it begins anticipation for our summer celebration of books and reading—the Library of Congress National Book Festival—which this year will take place on Sept. 2. Two weeks ago, the diverse author lineup for the 2017 festival was announced and today the poster is being revealed!

The poster artist is Roz Chast, a cartoonist whose work has been published in the New Yorker, Scientific American, the Harvard Business Review, Redbook and more. Chast started drawing cartoons as a child growing up in Brooklyn and went on to graduate from the Rhode Island School of Design. She has won numerous awards for her books and illustrations.

Cindy Moore, a graphics specialist at the Library of Congress, led a team of other graphics specialists at the Library in selecting Chast to design this year’s poster. However, the theme Chast came up with was all her own.

“Books have always been a major part of my life from the time I learned to read,” explains Chast. “They are a way to escape from the world, but also a way to feel more deeply connected to it. I wanted to make a poster that expressed the excitement, appreciation and delight I have for the books of my life.”

By the looks of this lively whimsical poster, she succeeded wildly!

You can download a copy of the poster from the Library of Congress National Book Festival website.

The 2017 Library of Congress National Book Festival, which is free for everyone, will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Sept. 2. The festival is made possible by the generosity of sponsors. You too can support the festival by making a gift now.

 

One Comment

  1. Deborah A. Dessaso
    April 12, 2017 at 12:33 pm

    Great poster! What an excellent way to show that books are living things!

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