InRetrospect: February 2014 Blogging Edition

Between winter and the winter olympics, the Library of Congress blogosphere offered up a variety of posts during February. Here is a sampling:

In The Muse: Performing Arts Blog

The Library celebrates ASCAP.

From the Catbird Seat: Poetry & Literature at the Library of Congress

Poetry features prominently in Olympic ad campaigns.

Picture This: Library of Congress Prints & Photos

Historical photographs showcase the sport of curling.

In Custodia Legis: Law Librarians of Congress

Law librarians share snow-day recollections.

Inside Adams: Science, Technology & Business

Hockey is highlighted in the Library of Congress collections.

The Signal: Digital Preservation

Mike Ashenfelder shares preservation tips for the gamers.

Teaching with the Library of Congress

A lesson on school gardens can chase away winter blues.

Folklife Today

Fox sighting inspires folksong reminiscences.

 

My Job at the Library: Karen Keninger

Karen Keninger, director of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped in the Library of Congress, discussed new technological developments in the interview excerpted below. What are your responsibilities as the Director of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped? The National Library Service (NLS) program has approximately 120 […]

The Sound of Drums

On Friday, November 22, 1963, the students in Mrs. Maxwell’s third-grade class at Sabin Elementary School in southwest Denver got a singular history lesson: the news came in that President John F. Kennedy had been murdered. Janet Maxwell, a popular young instructor who taught 25 kids reading, math, science and history by turns, was trying […]

A Rare Opportunity to Explore (and Take a Few Photographs)

(The following is a guest post from Michelle Springer in the Office of Strategic Initiatives.) On Veterans Day, Monday, November 11, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m, you’re invited to a special public event. Twice each year, the Library of Congress opens its magnificent Main Reading Room in the Thomas Jefferson Building in Washington, D.C., […]

One Day, 15 Hours, 53 Minutes and Counting …

The Library of Congress National Book Festival is just hours away! It’s free … it’s open to the public on the National Mall … and it’s got fun and fascination for readers of all ages and tastes. No fewer than 112 stellar authors – historians, novelists, children’s and teens’ authors, poets, biographers, illustrators and graphic […]

Carrying a Torch — Ours!

With the Library of Congress National Book Festival just days away (it’s a week from this weekend, Saturday, Sept. 21 and Sunday, Sept. 22, free of charge on the National Mall) we have a lot to share in addition to more than 100 best-selling authors for readers of all ages.  One of the great stops […]

Inside the March on Washington: Moving On

(The following is a guest post by Guha Shankar, folklife specialist in the American Folklife Center and the Library’s project director of the Civil Rights History Project, and Kate Stewart, processing archivist in the American Folklife Center, who is principally responsible for organizing and making available collections with Civil Rights content in the division to […]

Inside the March on Washington: Speaking Truth to Power

(The following is a guest post by Guha Shankar, folklife specialist in the American Folklife Center and the Library’s Project Director of the Civil Rights History Project, a Congressionally mandated documentation initiative that is being carried out in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.) Dr. Martin Luther King’s […]

Inside the March on Washington: “Our Support Really Ran Deep”

(The following is a guest post by Guha Shankar, folklife specialist in the American Folklife Center and the Library’s Project Director of the Civil Rights History Project, a Congressionally mandated documentation initiative that is being carried out in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.) Fifty years later, the […]