Pics of the Week: Step Right Up, Folks!

Today we bring you a trio of images from this week’s display of items found in the Library’s collections by our Library of Congress Junior Fellows–36 interns from around the nation who dig through our collections during their 10-week stays and showcase their findings at summer’s end. Chosen each year through a competitive program, the fellows fan out across the Library, assisting with archiving, analytical tasks and other work that is valuable to us and fascinating for them.

To the right, Junior Fellow Gina Apone of Washington, Michigan, who attends Michigan State

Gina Apone and George Thuronyi

Gina Apone and George Thuronyi

University, joins Copyright Office staffer George Thuronyi in displaying items found in Copyright’s files pertaining to a famous American circus of the 1890s, “The Great Wallace Shows.” Step right up, folks!

Below, you’ll see  Junior Fellow Joseph Patton of LeRoy, New York, who attends SUNY at Buffalo and worked this summer with the Library’s Veterans History Project, overseeing a display about the VHP histories of two Navy veterans. Norman Duberstein, a WWII Navy fighter pilot, put in a collection rich with materials concerning the Pacific war, including photos of Duberstein and others in his squadron, creative works by members of that group and two of Duberstein’s own combat diaries. The late James Davis Mayhew, who served as a radioman aboard the battleship U.S.S. New Mexico, provided photos, letters including his own cartoons, and documents pertaining to the battles his ship engaged in. The 15-year-old VHP, which specializes in oral histories in which veterans of U.S. wars are interviewed about their service, expects to collect its 100,000th oral history this year.

Joseph Patton at the Junior Fellows VHP table

Joseph Patton at the Junior Fellows VHP table

And this photo shows Junior Fellows Olivia Brum of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, who attends Alfred University, and Nicolas Kivi of Midland, Michigan, a student at the University of Tennessee, speaking with Associate Librarian for Library Services Mark Sweeney about a glass flute from the Library’s Dayton C. Miller Flute Collection, which they analyzed for preservation purposes. The Miller collection, which holds nearly 1,700 flutes from around the world, is housed in the Library’s Music Division.

Junior Fellows describing their preservation analysis of a glass flute

Junior Fellows Olivia Brum and Nicolas Kivi describing their preservation analysis of a glass flute

The Art of Acquisition

(The following is a feature story in the July/August 2015 issue of the Library of Congress Magazine, LCM. The story was written by Jennifer Gavin, a senior public affairs specialist in the Office of Communications. Joseph Puccio, the Library’s collection development officer, contributed to this story. You can read the issue in its entirety here.) The […]

Page From the Past: A Show About Nothing

When “The Seinfeld Chronicles” first aired on NBC on July 5, 1989, no one could have predicted that the “show about nothing” would become a cultural phenomenon. Inspired by real-life people and events, the show followed the life of a stand-up comedian and his friends. The pilot episode (pictured left), written by show creators Jerry […]

Happy 215th Anniversary Library of Congress!

A Message from the Librarian Today, on the Library of Congress’s 215th anniversary, I want especially to congratulate the Library’s extraordinary staff for their work in building this amazing, one-of-a-kind institution. I am, and always will be, deeply grateful for all they do. The heart and soul of this great library always has been its […]

A-B-C … Easy as One, Two, Three

On Oct. 16, 1758, Noah Webster, the “Father of American Scholarship and Education” was born. Lexicographers everywhere celebrate his contributions on his birthday, also known as “Dictionary Day.” As a young, rural Connecticut teacher, he used his own money to publish his first speller in 1783. Reissued throughout the 19th century, the 1829 “Blue Back […]

Mark Twain & Copyright

(The following is an article written by Harry Katz in the September-October 2014 issue of the Library of Congress Magazine, LCM. Katz is a former curator in the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division and author of a new Library publication, “Mark Twain’s America.”)  Samuel Clemens’ fight for the intellectual property rights to Mark Twain’s works helped protect […]

Junior Fellows Show Off Summer Finds

(The following is an article written by Rosemary Girard, intern in the Library of Congress Office of Communications, for the Library staff newsletter, The Gazette.) After weeks of researching, curating and unearthing some of the Library of Congress’s millions of artifacts, members of the Junior Fellows Program had a chance to present their most interesting […]

Rare Map on Display at Library Scored Some “Firsts”

(The following is a guest post by Wendi A. Maloney, writer-editor in the U.S. Copyright Office.) Engraver Abel Buell “came out of nowhere,” at least in terms of cartography, when he printed a United States map in 1784. “He’d never done a map before,” says Edward Redmond of the Library’s Geography and Map Division. Nonetheless, […]

Pics of the Week: Behind the Music

Last week, the Library hosted the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Foundation for its annual “We Write the Songs” concert, featuring the songwriters performing and telling the stories behind their own music. Carly Simon, Randy Newman and Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart joined others in performing some of their most popular tunes. “We used […]

214 Years Young

The Library of Congress celebrates its 214th birthday today. Founded on April 24, 1800, thanks to an appropriation approved by Pres. John Adams of $5,000 for the purchase of “such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress.” What started with a whopping 740 books and three maps has evolved to more than […]